FortinGagnon-BertrandVezinaEtAl2002

Référence

Fortin, J.A., Gagnon-Bertrand, E., Vezina, L. and Rompre, M. (2002) Organic compounds in the environment: Preferential bromide and pesticide movement to tile drains under different cropping practices. Journal of Environmental Quality, 31(6):1940-1952. (Scopus )

Résumé

Subsurface drainage systems are useful tools to study chemical leaching in soils. Our objective was to compare the breakthrough behavior of bromide, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamid] to tile drains under two fall tillage practices (conventional tillage [CT] with a moldboard plow, and reduced tillage [RT] with a chisel plow) in field plots cultivated with corn (Zea mays L.). Leachate volume were greater in RT than in CT, with no statistical differences. Soil analysis showed that bromide migrated deeper in the soil profile than both herbicides, with little tillage effect. All chemicals were detected in drainage water at the same time and followed an event-driven behavior. Tillage had no effect on atrazine and metolachlor found in drainage water, while bromide concentration peaks were higher in RT than in CT in 1999. Concentration peaks were recorded earlier for atrazine and metolachlor than for bromide. Plots of cumulative relative chemical mass (cumulative mass divided by total mass measured in drainage) as a function of cumulative drainage were mostly linear for bromide, while they were S-shaped for both herbicides. Drainage that corresponded to 50% of relative cumulative mass ranged from 40 to 55% for bromide and from 5 to 28% for both herbicides. Rapid chemical movement to tile drains suggested that preferential flow was important in both CT and RT, and that these tillage practices had little influence on this phenomena.

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@ARTICLE { FortinGagnon-BertrandVezinaEtAl2002,
    AUTHOR = { Fortin, J.A. and Gagnon-Bertrand, E. and Vezina, L. and Rompre, M. },
    TITLE = { Organic compounds in the environment: Preferential bromide and pesticide movement to tile drains under different cropping practices },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Environmental Quality },
    YEAR = { 2002 },
    VOLUME = { 31 },
    NUMBER = { 6 },
    PAGES = { 1940-1952 },
    NOTE = { cited By 29 },
    ABSTRACT = { Subsurface drainage systems are useful tools to study chemical leaching in soils. Our objective was to compare the breakthrough behavior of bromide, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamid] to tile drains under two fall tillage practices (conventional tillage [CT] with a moldboard plow, and reduced tillage [RT] with a chisel plow) in field plots cultivated with corn (Zea mays L.). Leachate volume were greater in RT than in CT, with no statistical differences. Soil analysis showed that bromide migrated deeper in the soil profile than both herbicides, with little tillage effect. All chemicals were detected in drainage water at the same time and followed an event-driven behavior. Tillage had no effect on atrazine and metolachlor found in drainage water, while bromide concentration peaks were higher in RT than in CT in 1999. Concentration peaks were recorded earlier for atrazine and metolachlor than for bromide. Plots of cumulative relative chemical mass (cumulative mass divided by total mass measured in drainage) as a function of cumulative drainage were mostly linear for bromide, while they were S-shaped for both herbicides. Drainage that corresponded to 50% of relative cumulative mass ranged from 40 to 55% for bromide and from 5 to 28% for both herbicides. Rapid chemical movement to tile drains suggested that preferential flow was important in both CT and RT, and that these tillage practices had little influence on this phenomena. },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    KEYWORDS = { Bromine compounds; Cultivation; Drainage; Herbicides; Leaching; Organic compounds; Pesticides; Soils, Tillage, Environmental engineering, atrazine; bromide; herbicide; metolachlor; pesticide; surface water; acetamide derivative; atrazine; bromide; herbicide; metolachlor, agriculture; article; corn; crop production; leaching; nonhuman; pest control; sand; soil analysis; soil pollution; water contamination; equipment design; maize; soil pollutant; water flow; water pollution; water supply, Zea mays, Acetamides; Agriculture; Atrazine; Bromides; Equipment Design; Herbicides; Soil Pollutants; Water Movements; Water Pollution; Water Supply; Zea mays },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-0036836052&partnerID=40&md5=a6baeaded0d341f5c7669a41919d0de0 },
}

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