LorenzettiDelagrangeBouffardEtAl2008

Référence

Lorenzetti, F., Delagrange, S., Bouffard, D. and Nolet, P. (2008) Establishment, survivorship, and growth of yellow birch seedlings after site preparation treatments in large gaps. Forest Ecology and Management, 254(2):350-361. (Scopus )

Résumé

The occurrence of yellow birch (YB) in the northeastern forests of North America is a source of concern. Several guidelines suggest ways to favor the regeneration of this species, including creating openings from small gaps to large clearcuts, coupled or not with a variety of soil preparation treatments. However, it is not clear if soil preparation treatment favors YB establishment by simply increasing the availability of good seedbed types, or by also altering competition pressure exerted by interfering species during the period of seedling establishment. For this study, large gaps (900 m<sup>2</sup>) were created in a 70-year old YB dominated forest, to which three treatments differing in soil disturbance intensities were applied (i.e., soil scarification (i) using a rake [raking]; or (ii) by dragging slash out to the edges of the gap [slash drag]; and (iii) limited to the passage of the harvesting equipment [control]). The proportion of seedbed types reportedly most favorable for YB establishment (i.e., mineral-dominated) increased as the severity of the site preparation increased. The opposite was observed for organic-dominated seedbeds. As a result, the stocking of YB seedlings increased with the severity of site preparation. However, YB stocking was deemed sufficient in all gaps to ensure future canopy dominance, even in the control treatment. Although YB seedlings generally achieved greater heights as site preparation intensity increased, it was clear that this did not reflect vigorous growth as, on average, greater heights coincided with greater seedling height-diameter ratios. At the seedbed level, height-diameter ratio was associated with an increase in surrounding competition pressure and an increase in the incidence of stem apical death (SAD), which in turn decreased height differences among seedbed types by the end of the study. At the gap level, this blurred the advantages of site preparation over a laisser-faire strategy. The incidence of SAD was greatest in the slash drag and the rake treatments. Consequently, we cannot say that intense soil scarification is worth the expenses, especially in stands where YB seed sources are abundant. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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@ARTICLE { LorenzettiDelagrangeBouffardEtAl2008,
    AUTHOR = { Lorenzetti, F. and Delagrange, S. and Bouffard, D. and Nolet, P. },
    TITLE = { Establishment, survivorship, and growth of yellow birch seedlings after site preparation treatments in large gaps },
    JOURNAL = { Forest Ecology and Management },
    YEAR = { 2008 },
    VOLUME = { 254 },
    PAGES = { 350-361 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    ABSTRACT = { The occurrence of yellow birch (YB) in the northeastern forests of North America is a source of concern. Several guidelines suggest ways to favor the regeneration of this species, including creating openings from small gaps to large clearcuts, coupled or not with a variety of soil preparation treatments. However, it is not clear if soil preparation treatment favors YB establishment by simply increasing the availability of good seedbed types, or by also altering competition pressure exerted by interfering species during the period of seedling establishment. For this study, large gaps (900 m<sup>2</sup>) were created in a 70-year old YB dominated forest, to which three treatments differing in soil disturbance intensities were applied (i.e., soil scarification (i) using a rake [raking]; or (ii) by dragging slash out to the edges of the gap [slash drag]; and (iii) limited to the passage of the harvesting equipment [control]). The proportion of seedbed types reportedly most favorable for YB establishment (i.e., mineral-dominated) increased as the severity of the site preparation increased. The opposite was observed for organic-dominated seedbeds. As a result, the stocking of YB seedlings increased with the severity of site preparation. However, YB stocking was deemed sufficient in all gaps to ensure future canopy dominance, even in the control treatment. Although YB seedlings generally achieved greater heights as site preparation intensity increased, it was clear that this did not reflect vigorous growth as, on average, greater heights coincided with greater seedling height-diameter ratios. At the seedbed level, height-diameter ratio was associated with an increase in surrounding competition pressure and an increase in the incidence of stem apical death (SAD), which in turn decreased height differences among seedbed types by the end of the study. At the gap level, this blurred the advantages of site preparation over a laisser-faire strategy. The incidence of SAD was greatest in the slash drag and the rake treatments. Consequently, we cannot say that intense soil scarification is worth the expenses, especially in stands where YB seed sources are abundant. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996): 1 Export Date: 10 February 2010 Source: Scopus CODEN: FECMD doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2007.08.010 },
    ISSN = { 03781127 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Competition, Gaps, Growth, Height-diameter ratio, Regeneration, Seedlings, Shoot apical death, Site preparation, Yellow birch, Forestry, Growth kinetics, Harvesting, Soils, Height diameter ratio, Shoot apical death, Soil preparation treatments, Seed, apical dominance, canopy gap, deciduous forest, forest management, plowing, seed size, seedling establishment, soil stabilization, stocking density, Forestry, Harvesting, Seeds, Soil, North America, Betula alleghaniensis },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2010.02.10 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-37549037119&partnerID=40&md5=c5f6757233be2f2c7fbbacbe1c03716d },
}

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