LaliberteShipleyNortonEtAl2012

Référence

Laliberté, E., Shipley, B., Norton, D.A. and Scott, D. (2012) Which plant traits determine abundance under long-term shifts in soil resource availability and grazing intensity? Journal of Ecology, 100(3):662-677. (Scopus )

Résumé

Soil resource availability and disturbance are widely recognized as key drivers of plant community structure. However, the relative importance of different plant traits in determining species abundance following shifts in soil resource availability and disturbance remains little studied, particularly in long-term experiments. We studied trait-based plant community assembly in a 27-year grassland experiment where 25 plant species were sown into resident vegetation, after which annual manipulations of soil resource availability (five levels of superphosphate fertilizer; the highest level was also irrigated) and disturbance (three 'mob-grazed' sheep grazing intensity levels: lax, moderate, hard) were applied. We used community assembly through trait selection (CATS) models based on entropy maximization to predict species relative abundances and to quantify the relative importance of each trait in determining abundance. Plant species were primarily differentiated along a trade-off axis corresponding to traits promoting rapid growth (e.g. high leaf [N] and specific leaf area [SLA]) vs. those promoting long leaf life span. Using 12 traits, the CATS model predicted >80% of the variation in the relative abundances of 51 species, suggesting that trait-based filtering was important. Species with leaf attributes that reduce nutrient losses held a long-term advantage under the lowest soil resource availability, whereas those associated with a rapid growth rate became dominant under soil resource addition. Species with thinner leaves were also favoured under greater soil resource availability, which may reflect a strategy to maximize SLA without sacrificing leaf density and thus maintain leaf structural defences under grazing disturbance. Greater leaf [S] and the ability to symbiotically fix atmospheric N were favoured under greater soil resource availability. Greater plant height, thinner leaves and higher leaf [N] were favoured under lower grazing intensity. Synthesis. Our results highlight the importance of species functional differences to understand how plant communities react to increases in soil resource availability and disturbance, two important and inseparable components of land-use change in grasslands world-wide. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Ecology © 2012 British Ecological Society.

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@ARTICLE { LaliberteShipleyNortonEtAl2012,
    AUTHOR = { Laliberte, E. and Shipley, B. and Norton, D.A. and Scott, D. },
    TITLE = { Which plant traits determine abundance under long-term shifts in soil resource availability and grazing intensity? },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2012 },
    VOLUME = { 100 },
    PAGES = { 662-677 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    NOTE = { cited By 26 },
    ABSTRACT = { Soil resource availability and disturbance are widely recognized as key drivers of plant community structure. However, the relative importance of different plant traits in determining species abundance following shifts in soil resource availability and disturbance remains little studied, particularly in long-term experiments. We studied trait-based plant community assembly in a 27-year grassland experiment where 25 plant species were sown into resident vegetation, after which annual manipulations of soil resource availability (five levels of superphosphate fertilizer; the highest level was also irrigated) and disturbance (three 'mob-grazed' sheep grazing intensity levels: lax, moderate, hard) were applied. We used community assembly through trait selection (CATS) models based on entropy maximization to predict species relative abundances and to quantify the relative importance of each trait in determining abundance. Plant species were primarily differentiated along a trade-off axis corresponding to traits promoting rapid growth (e.g. high leaf [N] and specific leaf area [SLA]) vs. those promoting long leaf life span. Using 12 traits, the CATS model predicted >80% of the variation in the relative abundances of 51 species, suggesting that trait-based filtering was important. Species with leaf attributes that reduce nutrient losses held a long-term advantage under the lowest soil resource availability, whereas those associated with a rapid growth rate became dominant under soil resource addition. Species with thinner leaves were also favoured under greater soil resource availability, which may reflect a strategy to maximize SLA without sacrificing leaf density and thus maintain leaf structural defences under grazing disturbance. Greater leaf [S] and the ability to symbiotically fix atmospheric N were favoured under greater soil resource availability. Greater plant height, thinner leaves and higher leaf [N] were favoured under lower grazing intensity. Synthesis. Our results highlight the importance of species functional differences to understand how plant communities react to increases in soil resource availability and disturbance, two important and inseparable components of land-use change in grasslands world-wide. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Ecology © 2012 British Ecological Society. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Assembly rules; Community-weighted trait; Determinants of plant community diversity and structure; Environmental filtering; Functional composition; Grassland; Land-use change; Maximum entropy },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/j.1365-2745.2011.01947.x },
    KEYWORDS = { abundance; community structure; ecological modeling; grassland; grazing pressure; land use change; life history trait; maximum entropy analysis; plant community; resource availability; vegetation structure, Ovis aries },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859727251&partnerID=40&md5=77e0aa7b90df6eca51c31ed39cee9e33 },
}

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