LaliberteLambersBurgessEtAl2015

Référence

Laliberté, E., Lambers, H., Burgess, T.I., Wright, S.J. (2015) Phosphorus limitation, soil-borne pathogens and the coexistence of plant species in hyperdiverse forests and shrublands. New Phytologist, 206(2):507-521. (Scopus )

Résumé

507 I. 507 II. 509 III. 510 IV. 510 V. 512 VI. 516 VII. 518 518 References 518 Summary: Hyperdiverse forests occur in the lowland tropics, whereas the most species-rich shrublands are found in regions such as south-western Australia (kwongan) and South Africa (fynbos). Despite large differences, these ecosystems share an important characteristic: their soils are strongly weathered and phosphorus (P) is a key growth-limiting nutrient. Soil-borne pathogens are increasingly being recognized as drivers of plant diversity in lowland tropical rainforests, but have received little attention in species-rich shrublands. We suggest a trade-off in which the species most proficient at acquiring P have ephemeral roots that are particularly susceptible to soil-borne pathogens. This could equalize out the differences in competitive ability among co-occurring species in these ecosystems, thus contributing to coexistence. Moreover, effective protection against soil-borne pathogens by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi might explain the occurrence of monodominant stands of ECM trees and shrubs amongst otherwise species-rich communities. We identify gaps in our knowledge which need to be filled in order to evaluate a possible link between P limitation, fine root traits, soil-borne pathogens and local plant species diversity. Such a link may help to explain how numerous plant species can coexist in hyperdiverse rainforests and shrublands, and, conversely, how monodominant stands can develop in these ecosystems. © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

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@ARTICLE { LaliberteLambersBurgessEtAl2015,
    AUTHOR = { Laliberte, E. and Lambers, H. and Burgess, T.I. and Wright, S.J. },
    TITLE = { Phosphorus limitation, soil-borne pathogens and the coexistence of plant species in hyperdiverse forests and shrublands },
    JOURNAL = { New Phytologist },
    YEAR = { 2015 },
    VOLUME = { 206 },
    PAGES = { 507-521 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { 507 I. 507 II. 509 III. 510 IV. 510 V. 512 VI. 516 VII. 518 518 References 518 Summary: Hyperdiverse forests occur in the lowland tropics, whereas the most species-rich shrublands are found in regions such as south-western Australia (kwongan) and South Africa (fynbos). Despite large differences, these ecosystems share an important characteristic: their soils are strongly weathered and phosphorus (P) is a key growth-limiting nutrient. Soil-borne pathogens are increasingly being recognized as drivers of plant diversity in lowland tropical rainforests, but have received little attention in species-rich shrublands. We suggest a trade-off in which the species most proficient at acquiring P have ephemeral roots that are particularly susceptible to soil-borne pathogens. This could equalize out the differences in competitive ability among co-occurring species in these ecosystems, thus contributing to coexistence. Moreover, effective protection against soil-borne pathogens by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi might explain the occurrence of monodominant stands of ECM trees and shrubs amongst otherwise species-rich communities. We identify gaps in our knowledge which need to be filled in order to evaluate a possible link between P limitation, fine root traits, soil-borne pathogens and local plant species diversity. Such a link may help to explain how numerous plant species can coexist in hyperdiverse rainforests and shrublands, and, conversely, how monodominant stands can develop in these ecosystems. © 2014 New Phytologist Trust. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Alpha diversity; Janzen-Connell hypothesis; Kwongan; Monodominance; Mycorrhizal fungi; Negative density dependence (NDD); Plant-soil feedback; Tropical rainforest },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/nph.13203 },
    KEYWORDS = { coexistence; dependency; ectomycorrhiza; fungus; growth rate; nutrient limitation; pathogen; phosphorus; species richness; tropical forest, Australia; South Africa; Western Australia, Fungi },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84925273062&partnerID=40&md5=219b22804da1fb4ad44198f4bfe1d376 },
}

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