DesplandLe2007

Reference

Despland, E. and Le Huu, A. (2007) Pros and cons of group living in the forest tent caterpillar: Separating the roles of silk and of grouping. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 122(2):181-189.

Abstract

Group living can incur both benefits and costs, mediated by different mechanisms. In many gregarious caterpillars, collective use of a network of silk trails is thought to improve foraging. Grouping, i.e., close contact with conspecifics, has been postulated to have both positive (thermoregulation and predator defense) and negative (competition and pathogen transmission) effects. The present experiment distinguishes between silk produced by group members and grouping per se in their effects on growth and development of both early and late larval stadia of the forest tent caterpillar [Malacosoma disstria Hu?bner (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae)] in a laboratory context. For both developmental stadia tested, pre-established silk trails decreased latency to food finding and hence increased food consumption and growth rate. For younger larvae, pre-established silk also decreased investment in silk production. Grouping young caterpillars accelerated development at the expense of growth, possibly as a mechanism to avoid intraspecific competition in later larval stadia. In older caterpillars, grouping decreased meal duration, suggesting that competition can indeed occur towards the end of larval development, even in the presence of surplus food. This led to a decrease in growth without any effect on instar duration. The benefits of exogenous silk thus decreased during larval development, whereas the costs associated with crowding increased. Ontogenetic shifts in grouping are common in many taxa: the present study is among the first to provide empirical evidence for an adaptive explanation of observed ontogenetic changes in aggregative behavior. © 2007 The Authors.

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { DesplandLe2007,
    AUTHOR = { Despland, E. and Le Huu, A. },
    TITLE = { Pros and cons of group living in the forest tent caterpillar: Separating the roles of silk and of grouping },
    JOURNAL = { Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata },
    YEAR = { 2007 },
    VOLUME = { 122 },
    PAGES = { 181-189 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    NOTE = { 00138703 (ISSN) Export Date: 27 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: ETEAA doi: 10.1111/j.1570-7458.2006.00512.x Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Despland, E.; Biology Department; Concordia University; 7141 Sherbrooke St W. Montre?al, Que. H4B 1R6, Canada; email: despland@alcor.concordia.ca References: Addy, N.D., Rearing the forest tent caterpillar on an artificial diet (1969) Journal of Economic Entomology, 62, pp. 270-271; Applebaum, S.W., Heifetz, Y., Density-dependent physiological phase in insects (1999) Annual Review of Entomology, 44, pp. 317-341; Berenbaum, M.R., Green, E.S., Zangerl, A.R., Web costs and web defense in the parsnip webworm (Lepidoptera, Oecophoridae) (1993) Environmental Entomology, 22, pp. 791-795; Childress, M.J., Herrnkind, W.F., The ontogeny of social behaviour among juvenile Caribbean spiny lobsters (1996) Animal Behaviour, 51, pp. 675-687; Colasurdo, N., Despland, E., Social cues and following behavior in the forest tent caterpillar (2005) Journal of Insect Behavior, 18, pp. 77-87; Costa, J.T., Larval ontogeny and survivorship of eastern tent caterpillar colonies (1993) Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera, 32, pp. 89-98; Costa JT \& Pierce NE (1997) Social evolution in the Lepidoptera: ecological context and communication in larval societies. The Evolution of Social Behaviour in Insects and Arachnids (ed. by JC Choe \& BJ Crespi), pp. 407-442. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK; Costa, J.T., Ross, K.G., Fitness effects of group merging in a social insect (2003) Proceedings of the Royal Society London B, 270, pp. 1697-1702; Costa, J.T., Fitzgerald, T.D., Janzen, D.H., Trail-following behavior and natural history of the social caterpillar Arsenura armida in Costa Rica (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: Arsenurinae) (2003) Tropical Lepidoptera, 12, pp. 17-23; Denno, R.F., Benrey, B., Aggregation facilitates larval growth in the neotropical nymphalid butterfly Chlosyne janais (1997) Ecological Entomology, 22, pp. 133-141; Despland, E., Hamzeh, S., Ontogenetic changes in social behaviour in the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria (2004) Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 56, pp. 177-184; Fitzgerald TD (1993) Sociality in caterpillars. Caterpillars: Ecological and Evolutionary Constraints on Foraging (ed. by NE Stamp \& TM Casey), pp. 372-403. Chapman \& Hall, New York, NY, USA; Fitzgerald, T.D., (1995) The Tent Caterpillars, , Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY, USA; Fitzgerald, T.D., Costa, J.T., Trail-based communication and foraging behavior of young colonies of forest tent caterpillars (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) (1986) Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 79, pp. 999-1007; Fitzgerald, T.D., Costa, J.T., Collective behavior in social caterpillars (1999) Information Processing in Social Insects, pp. 379-400. , ed. by C Detrain, JL Deneubourg \& JM Pasteels, pp, Birkhau?ser Verlag, Basel, Switzerland; Fitzgerald, T.D., Visscher, C.R., Foraging behavior and growth of isolated larvae of a social caterpillar, Malacosoma americanum (1996) Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 81, pp. 293-299; Giraldeau, L.A., Caraco, T., (2000) Social Foraging Theory, , Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, USA; Grisdale, D., Malacosoma disstria (1985) Handbook of Insect Rearing, pp. 369-379. , ed. by P Singh \& RF Moore, Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Haukioja, E., Pakarinen, E., Niemela?, P., Iso-Ivari, L., Crowding-triggered phenotype responses alleviate consequences of crowding in Epirrita autumnata (Lep: Geometridae) (1988) Oecologia, 75, pp. 549-558; Hochuli, D.F., Insect herbivory and ontogeny: How do growth and development influence feeding behaviour, morphology and host use? (2001) Austral Ecology, 26, pp. 563-570; Hodson, A.C., An Ecological Study of the Forest Tent Caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hbn, in Northern Minnesota. University of Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station (1941) Technical Bulletin, p. 148; Krause, J., Ruxton, G.D., (2002) Living in Groups, , Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK; Lawrence, W.S., The effects of group size and host species on development and survivorship of a gregarious caterpillar, Halisidota carye (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) (1990) Ecological Entomology, 15, pp. 53-62; Loman, J., Growth and development of larval Rana temporaria: Local variation and countergradient selection (2003) Journal of Herpetology, 37, pp. 595-602; McCullagh, P., Nelder, J.A., (1989) Generalized Linear Models, , Chapman \& Hall, London, UK; Rasa, O.A.E., Aggregation in a desert Tenebrionid beetle: A cost/benefit analysis (1997) Ethology, 103, pp. 466-487; Ratchford, S.G., Eggleston, D.B., Size- and scale-dependent chemical attraction contribute to an ontogenetic shift in sociality (1998) Animal Behaviour, 56, pp. 1027-1034; Reader, T., Hochuli, D., Understanding gregariousness in a larval Lepidopteran: The roles of host plant, predation, and microclimate (2003) Ecological Entomology, 28, p. 729; Reavey, D., Why body size matters to caterpillars (1993) Caterpillars: Ecological and Evolutionary Constraints on Foraging, pp. 248-282. , ed. by NE Stamp \& TM Casey, pp, Chapman \& Hall, New York, NY, USA; Robison DJ (1993) The Feeding Ecology of the Forest Tent Caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hu?bner, Among Hybrid Poplar Clones, Populus spp. PhD Thesis, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; Rothman, L.D., Immediate and delayed effects of a viral pathogen and density on tent caterpillar performance (1997) Ecology, 78, pp. 1481-1493; Ruohoma?ki, K., Klemola, T., Kaitaniemi, P., Ka?a?r, M., Crowding-induced responses in a geometrid moth revisited: A field experiment (2003) Oikos, 103, pp. 489-496; Shiga, M., Effect of group size on the survival and development of young larvae of Malacosoma neustria testacea Motschulsky (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) and its role in the natural population (1976) Kontyu, 44, pp. 537-553; Tammaru, T., Ruohomaki, K., Montola, M., Crowding-induced plasticity in Epirrita autumnata (Lepidoptera: Geometridae): weak evidence of specific modifications in reaction norms (2000) Oikos, 90, pp. 171-181; Waldbauer, G.P., The consumption and utilization of food by insects (1968) Advances in Insect Physiology, 5, pp. 229-288; Werner, E.E., Gilliam, J.F., The ontogenetic niche and species interactions in size-structured populations (1984) Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 15, pp. 393-425. },
    ABSTRACT = { Group living can incur both benefits and costs, mediated by different mechanisms. In many gregarious caterpillars, collective use of a network of silk trails is thought to improve foraging. Grouping, i.e., close contact with conspecifics, has been postulated to have both positive (thermoregulation and predator defense) and negative (competition and pathogen transmission) effects. The present experiment distinguishes between silk produced by group members and grouping per se in their effects on growth and development of both early and late larval stadia of the forest tent caterpillar [Malacosoma disstria Hu?bner (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae)] in a laboratory context. For both developmental stadia tested, pre-established silk trails decreased latency to food finding and hence increased food consumption and growth rate. For younger larvae, pre-established silk also decreased investment in silk production. Grouping young caterpillars accelerated development at the expense of growth, possibly as a mechanism to avoid intraspecific competition in later larval stadia. In older caterpillars, grouping decreased meal duration, suggesting that competition can indeed occur towards the end of larval development, even in the presence of surplus food. This led to a decrease in growth without any effect on instar duration. The benefits of exogenous silk thus decreased during larval development, whereas the costs associated with crowding increased. Ontogenetic shifts in grouping are common in many taxa: the present study is among the first to provide empirical evidence for an adaptive explanation of observed ontogenetic changes in aggregative behavior. © 2007 The Authors. },
    KEYWORDS = { Gregarious Interference competition Lasiocampidae Lepidoptera Malacosoma disstria Ontogenetic shift Pheromone trails Social behavior },
    OWNER = { racinep },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.09.07 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ************* Écoles d'été et formation **************************** **********************************************************

Écoles d'été et formations

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...