MayerPrescottAbakerEtAl2020

Référence

Mayer, M., Prescott, C.E., Abaker, W.E.A., Augusto, L., Cécillon, L., Ferreira, G.W.D., James, J., Jandl, R., Katzensteiner, K., Laclau, J.-P., Laganiere, J., Nouvellon, Y., Pare, D., Stanturf, J.A., Vanguelova, E.I., Vesterdal, L. (2020) Influence of forest management activities on soil organic carbon stocks: A knowledge synthesis. Forest Ecology and Management, 466. (Scopus )

Résumé

Almost half of the total organic carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems is stored in forest soils. By altering rates of input or release of C from soils, forest management activities can influence soil C stocks in forests. In this review, we synthesize current evidence regarding the influences of 13 common forest management practices on forest soil C stocks. Afforestation of former croplands generally increases soil C stocks, whereas on former grasslands and peatlands, soil C stocks are unchanged or even reduced following afforestation. The conversion of primary forests to secondary forests generally reduces soil C stocks, particularly if the land is converted to an agricultural land-use prior to reforestation. Harvesting, particularly clear-cut harvesting, generally results in a reduction in soil C stocks, particularly in the forest floor and upper mineral soil. Removal of residues by harvesting whole-trees and stumps negatively affects soil C stocks. Soil disturbance from site preparation decreases soil C stocks, particularly in the organic top soil, however improved growth of tree seedlings may outweigh soil C losses over a rotation. Nitrogen (N) addition has an overall positive effect on soil C stocks across a wide range of forest ecosystems. Likewise, higher stocks and faster accumulation of soil C occur under tree species with N-fixing associates. Stocks and accumulation rates of soil C also differ under different tree species, with coniferous species accumulating more C in the forest floor and broadleaved species tending to store more C in the mineral soil. There is some evidence that increased tree species diversity could positively affect soil C stocks in temperate and subtropical forests, but tree species identity, particularly N-fixing species, seems to have a stronger impact on soil C stocks than tree species diversity. Management of stand density and thinning have small effects on forest soil C stocks. In forests with high populations of ungulate herbivores, reduction in herbivory levels can increase soil C stocks. Removal of plant biomass for fodder and fuel is related to a reduction in the soil C stocks. Fire management practices such as prescribed burning reduce soil C stocks, but less so than wildfires which are more intense. For each practice, we identify existing gaps in knowledge and suggest research to address the gaps. © 2020

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@ARTICLE { MayerPrescottAbakerEtAl2020,
    AUTHOR = { Mayer, M. and Prescott, C.E. and Abaker, W.E.A. and Augusto, L. and Cécillon, L. and Ferreira, G.W.D. and James, J. and Jandl, R. and Katzensteiner, K. and Laclau, J.-P. and Laganiere, J. and Nouvellon, Y. and Pare, D. and Stanturf, J.A. and Vanguelova, E.I. and Vesterdal, L. },
    JOURNAL = { Forest Ecology and Management },
    TITLE = { Influence of forest management activities on soil organic carbon stocks: A knowledge synthesis },
    YEAR = { 2020 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    VOLUME = { 466 },
    ABSTRACT = { Almost half of the total organic carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems is stored in forest soils. By altering rates of input or release of C from soils, forest management activities can influence soil C stocks in forests. In this review, we synthesize current evidence regarding the influences of 13 common forest management practices on forest soil C stocks. Afforestation of former croplands generally increases soil C stocks, whereas on former grasslands and peatlands, soil C stocks are unchanged or even reduced following afforestation. The conversion of primary forests to secondary forests generally reduces soil C stocks, particularly if the land is converted to an agricultural land-use prior to reforestation. Harvesting, particularly clear-cut harvesting, generally results in a reduction in soil C stocks, particularly in the forest floor and upper mineral soil. Removal of residues by harvesting whole-trees and stumps negatively affects soil C stocks. Soil disturbance from site preparation decreases soil C stocks, particularly in the organic top soil, however improved growth of tree seedlings may outweigh soil C losses over a rotation. Nitrogen (N) addition has an overall positive effect on soil C stocks across a wide range of forest ecosystems. Likewise, higher stocks and faster accumulation of soil C occur under tree species with N-fixing associates. Stocks and accumulation rates of soil C also differ under different tree species, with coniferous species accumulating more C in the forest floor and broadleaved species tending to store more C in the mineral soil. There is some evidence that increased tree species diversity could positively affect soil C stocks in temperate and subtropical forests, but tree species identity, particularly N-fixing species, seems to have a stronger impact on soil C stocks than tree species diversity. Management of stand density and thinning have small effects on forest soil C stocks. In forests with high populations of ungulate herbivores, reduction in herbivory levels can increase soil C stocks. Removal of plant biomass for fodder and fuel is related to a reduction in the soil C stocks. Fire management practices such as prescribed burning reduce soil C stocks, but less so than wildfires which are more intense. For each practice, we identify existing gaps in knowledge and suggest research to address the gaps. © 2020 },
    AFFILIATION = { Institute of Forest Ecology, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), Peter-Jordan Straße 82, Vienna, 1190, Austria; Forest Soils and Biogeochemistry, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL, Zürcherstrasse 111, 8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland; Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada; Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, University of Khartoum, Sudan 13314 Shambat, Sudan; INRAE, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, UMR 1391 ISPA, Villenave d'Ornon, 33882, France; Université de Normandie, UNIROUEN, INRAE, ECODIV, Rouen, France; Laboratoire de Géologie, UMR 8538, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université PSL, CNRS, Paris, France; Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, P O Drawer E – AikenSC 29802, United States; Exponent, Inc., 15375 SE 30th Pl, Suite 250, Bellevue, WA 98007, United States; Department of Forest Ecology and Soils, Austrian Research Center for Forests, Seckendorff-Gudent-Weg 8, Vienna, 1131, Austria; CIRAD, UMR Eco&Sols, Montpellier, 34060, France; Eco&Sols, Univ Montpellier, CIRAD, INRA, IRD, Montpellier SupAgro 34060, Montpellier, France; Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre, 1055 Du P.E.P.S. Street, P.O. Box 10380, Québec, QC G1V 4C7, Canada; Institute of Forestry and Rural Engineering, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 5, Tartu, 51014, Estonia; Forest Research, Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey GU10 4LH, United Kingdom; Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, Frederiksberg C, 1958, Denmark },
    ART_NUMBER = { 118127 },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Review },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.foreco.2020.118127 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85082833000&doi=10.1016%2fj.foreco.2020.118127&partnerID=40&md5=73d8dd831338c16a8ea1d0d35ad21d2d },
}

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