DuchesneHouleOuimetEtAl2016

Référence

Duchesne, L., Houle, D., Ouimet, R., Lambert, M.-C. and Logan, T. (2016) Aboveground carbon in Quebec forests: Stock quantification at the provincial scale and assessment of temperature, precipitation and edaphic properties effects on the potential stand-level stocking. PeerJ, 2016(3). (Scopus )

Résumé

Biological carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems plays an important role in the net balance of greenhouse gases, acting as a carbon sink for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the abiotic environmental factors (including climate) that control carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests and consequently, about their potential response to climate changes. From a set of more than 94,000 forest inventory plots and a large set of spatial data on forest attributes interpreted from aerial photographs, we constructed a fine-resolution map (~375 m) of the current carbon stock in aboveground live biomass in the 435,000 km2 of managed forests in Quebec, Canada. Our analysis resulted in an area-weighted average aboveground carbon stock for productive forestland of 37.6 Mg ha-1, which is lower than commonly reported values for similar environment. Models capable of predicting the influence of mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, and soil physical environment on maximum stand-level aboveground carbon stock (MSAC) were developed. These models were then used to project the future MSAC in response to climate change. Our results indicate that the MSAC was significantly related to both mean annual temperature and precipitation, or to the interaction of these variables, and suggest that Quebec's managed forests MSAC may increase by 20% by 2041-2070 in response to climate change. Along with changes in climate, the natural disturbance regime and forest management practices will nevertheless largely drive future carbon stock at the landscape scale. Overall, our results allow accurate accounting of carbon stock in aboveground live tree biomass of Quebec's forests, and provide a better understanding of possible feedbacks between climate change and carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests. © 2016 Duchesne et al.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { DuchesneHouleOuimetEtAl2016,
    AUTHOR = { Duchesne, L. and Houle, D. and Ouimet, R. and Lambert, M.-C. and Logan, T. },
    TITLE = { Aboveground carbon in Quebec forests: Stock quantification at the provincial scale and assessment of temperature, precipitation and edaphic properties effects on the potential stand-level stocking },
    JOURNAL = { PeerJ },
    YEAR = { 2016 },
    VOLUME = { 2016 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Biological carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems plays an important role in the net balance of greenhouse gases, acting as a carbon sink for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the abiotic environmental factors (including climate) that control carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests and consequently, about their potential response to climate changes. From a set of more than 94,000 forest inventory plots and a large set of spatial data on forest attributes interpreted from aerial photographs, we constructed a fine-resolution map (~375 m) of the current carbon stock in aboveground live biomass in the 435,000 km2 of managed forests in Quebec, Canada. Our analysis resulted in an area-weighted average aboveground carbon stock for productive forestland of 37.6 Mg ha-1, which is lower than commonly reported values for similar environment. Models capable of predicting the influence of mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, and soil physical environment on maximum stand-level aboveground carbon stock (MSAC) were developed. These models were then used to project the future MSAC in response to climate change. Our results indicate that the MSAC was significantly related to both mean annual temperature and precipitation, or to the interaction of these variables, and suggest that Quebec's managed forests MSAC may increase by 20% by 2041-2070 in response to climate change. Along with changes in climate, the natural disturbance regime and forest management practices will nevertheless largely drive future carbon stock at the landscape scale. Overall, our results allow accurate accounting of carbon stock in aboveground live tree biomass of Quebec's forests, and provide a better understanding of possible feedbacks between climate change and carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests. © 2016 Duchesne et al. },
    ART_NUMBER = { 1767 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Biomass; Boreal forest; Carbon stock; Climate change },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.7717/peerj.1767 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84963940161&partnerID=40&md5=5aa08b1e5f64c16f31f4338589980795 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ************* Colloque **************************** **********************************************************

1er au 3 mai 2019
UQAC

********************************************************** ************* R à Québec 2019**************************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ********************* Traits **************************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ************* Écoles d'été et formation **************************** **********************************************************

Écoles d'été et formations

Cours intensif sur l'analyse des pistes 
6-10 mai 2019, Université de Sherbrooke
Cours intensif : Taxonomie et méthodes d’échantillonnage en tourbières 
6-17 mai 2019, Université Laval
Dendrochronological Fieldweek 2019 
16-21 mai 2019, Station FERLD
Traits Fonctionnels des Organismes - École thématique internationale
19-24 mai 2019, Porquerolles, France
Cours aux cycles supérieurs: Terrain avancé en géographie 
10-15 juin 2019, FERLD, Abitibi-Témiscamingue
École d'été « Drones et télédétection environnementale » 
13-14 juin 2019, Sherbrooke
Ecole d'été en Biologie et Ecologie intégratives 
6-12 juillet 2019, Pyrénées françaises
École d'été en modélisation de la biodiversité 
19-23 août 2019, Orford
Cours aux cycles supérieurs: Aménagement des écosystèmes forestiers 
19-30 août 2019, Station FERLD

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Carapace ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Budworm ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Colibri **************************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ********** Pub 6 - Au coeur de l'arbre *********** **********************************************************

...Une exposition
virtuelle sur l'arbre!

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...