SpeedSkjelbredBarrioEtAl2019

Reference

Speed, J.D.M., Skjelbred, I.Å., Barrio, I.C., Martin, M.D., Berteaux, D., Bueno, C.G., Christie, K.S., Forbes, B.C., Forbey, J., Fortin, D., Grytnes, J.-A., Hoset, K.S., Lecomte, N., Marteinsdóttir, B., Mosbacher, J.B., Pedersen, Å.Ø., Ravolainen, V., Rees, E.C., Skarin, A., Sokolova, N., Thornhill, A.H., Tombre, I., Soininen, E.M. (2019) Trophic interactions and abiotic factors drive functional and phylogenetic structure of vertebrate herbivore communities across the Arctic tundra biome. Ecography, 42(6):1152-1163. (Scopus )

Abstract

Communities are assembled from species that evolve or colonise a given geographic region, and persist in the face of abiotic conditions and interactions with other species. The evolutionary and colonisation histories of communities are characterised by phylogenetic diversity, while functional diversity is indicative of abiotic and biotic conditions. The relationship between functional and phylogenetic diversity infers whether species functional traits are divergent (differing between related species) or convergent (similar among distantly related species). Biotic interactions and abiotic conditions are known to influence macroecological patterns in species richness, but how functional and phylogenetic diversity of guilds vary with biotic factors, and the relative importance of biotic drivers in relation to geographic and abiotic drivers is unknown. In this study, we test whether geographic, abiotic or biotic factors drive biome-scale spatial patterns of functional and phylogenetic diversity and functional convergence in vertebrate herbivores across the Arctic tundra biome. We found that functional and phylogenetic diversity both peaked in the western North American Arctic, and that spatial patterns in both were best predicted by trophic interactions, namely vegetation productivity and predator diversity, as well as climatic severity. Our results show that both bottom–up and top–down trophic interactions, as well as winter temperatures, drive the functional and phylogenetic structure of Arctic vertebrate herbivore assemblages. This has implications for changing Arctic ecosystems; under future warming and northward movement of predators potential increases in phylogenetic and functional diversity in vertebrate herbivores may occur. Our study thus demonstrates that trophic interactions can determine large-scale functional and phylogenetic diversity just as strongly as abiotic conditions. © 2019 The Authors

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@ARTICLE { SpeedSkjelbredBarrioEtAl2019,
    AUTHOR = { Speed, J.D.M. and Skjelbred, I.Å. and Barrio, I.C. and Martin, M.D. and Berteaux, D. and Bueno, C.G. and Christie, K.S. and Forbes, B.C. and Forbey, J. and Fortin, D. and Grytnes, J.-A. and Hoset, K.S. and Lecomte, N. and Marteinsdóttir, B. and Mosbacher, J.B. and Pedersen, Å.Ø. and Ravolainen, V. and Rees, E.C. and Skarin, A. and Sokolova, N. and Thornhill, A.H. and Tombre, I. and Soininen, E.M. },
    TITLE = { Trophic interactions and abiotic factors drive functional and phylogenetic structure of vertebrate herbivore communities across the Arctic tundra biome },
    JOURNAL = { Ecography },
    YEAR = { 2019 },
    VOLUME = { 42 },
    NUMBER = { 6 },
    PAGES = { 1152-1163 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Communities are assembled from species that evolve or colonise a given geographic region, and persist in the face of abiotic conditions and interactions with other species. The evolutionary and colonisation histories of communities are characterised by phylogenetic diversity, while functional diversity is indicative of abiotic and biotic conditions. The relationship between functional and phylogenetic diversity infers whether species functional traits are divergent (differing between related species) or convergent (similar among distantly related species). Biotic interactions and abiotic conditions are known to influence macroecological patterns in species richness, but how functional and phylogenetic diversity of guilds vary with biotic factors, and the relative importance of biotic drivers in relation to geographic and abiotic drivers is unknown. In this study, we test whether geographic, abiotic or biotic factors drive biome-scale spatial patterns of functional and phylogenetic diversity and functional convergence in vertebrate herbivores across the Arctic tundra biome. We found that functional and phylogenetic diversity both peaked in the western North American Arctic, and that spatial patterns in both were best predicted by trophic interactions, namely vegetation productivity and predator diversity, as well as climatic severity. Our results show that both bottom–up and top–down trophic interactions, as well as winter temperatures, drive the functional and phylogenetic structure of Arctic vertebrate herbivore assemblages. This has implications for changing Arctic ecosystems; under future warming and northward movement of predators potential increases in phylogenetic and functional diversity in vertebrate herbivores may occur. Our study thus demonstrates that trophic interactions can determine large-scale functional and phylogenetic diversity just as strongly as abiotic conditions. © 2019 The Authors },
    AFFILIATION = { Dept of Natural History, NTNU Univ. Museum, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Dept of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Univ. of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Canada Research Chair on Northern Biodiversity and Centre for Northern Studies, Univ. du Québec à Rimouski, Rimouski, QC, Canada; Inst. of Ecology and Earth Sciences, Dept of Botany, Univ. of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia; Alaska Dept of Fish and Game, Anchorage, AK, Canada; Arctic Centre, Univ. of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland; Dept of Biological Sciences, Boise State Univ, Boise, ID, United States; Centre d'Étude de la Forêt and Dépt de Biologie, Univ, Laval, QC, Canada; Dept of Biological Sciences, Univ. of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Section of Ecology, Dept of Biology, Univ. of Turku, Turku, Finland; Canada Research Chair in Polar and Boreal Écologie and Centre for Northern Studies, Dépt de Biologie, Univ. de Moncton, Moncton, NB, Canada; The Soil Conservation Service of Iceland, Gunnarsholt, Hella, Iceland; Dept of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Norwegian Polar Inst., Fram Centre, Tromsø, Norway; Martin Mere Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, Burscough, Lancashire, United Kingdom; Dept of Animal Nutrition and Management, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Arctic Research Station of Inst. of Plant and Animal Ecology, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Labytnangi, Arctic Research Center of Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District, Salekhard, Russian Federation; Australian Tropical Herbarium, James Cook Univ, Cairns, QLD, Australia; Univ. and Jepson Herbaria, and: Dept of Integrative Biology, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, United States; Norwegian Inst. for Nature Research NINA, Tromsø, Norway; Dept of Arctic and Marine Biology, UiT The Arctic Univ. of Norway, Tromsø, Norway },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Arctic; community structure; functional diversity; herbivory; phylogenetic diversity; trophic interactions },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/ecog.04347 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85065056249&doi=10.1111%2fecog.04347&partnerID=40&md5=6c05fa3537a4be7b46090d3dd1feae55 },
}

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