BabinFortinWilmshurstEtAl2011

Reference

Babin, J.-S., Fortin, D., Wilmshurst, J.F., Fortin, M.-E. (2011) Energy gains predict the distribution of plains bison across populations and ecosystems. Ecology, 92(1):240-252. (Scopus )

Abstract

Developing tools that help predict animal distribution in the face of environmental change is central to understanding ecosystem function, but it remains a significant ecological challenge. We tested whether a single foraging currency could explain bison (Bison bison) distribution in dissimilar environments: a largely forested environment in Prince Albert National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada) and a prairie environment in Grasslands National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada). We blended extensive behavioral observations, relocations of radio-collared bison, vegetation surveys, and laboratory analyses to spatially link bison distribution in the two parks and expected gains for different nutritional currencies. In Prince Albert National Park, bison were more closely associated with the distribution of plants that maximized their instantaneous energy intake rate (IDE) than their daily intake of digestible energy. This result reflected both bison's intensity of use of individual meadows and their selection of foraging sites within meadows. On this basis, we tested whether IDE could explain the spatial dynamics of bison reintroduced to Grasslands National Park. As predicted, bison distribution in this park best matched spatial patterns of plants offering rapid IDE rather than rapid sodium intake, phosphorus intake, or daily intake of digestible energy. Because the two study areas have very different plant communities, a phenomenological model of resource selection developed in one area could not be used to predict animal distribution in the other. We were able, however, to successfully infer the distribution of bison from their foraging objective. This consistency in foraging currency across ecosystems and populations provides a strong basis for forecasting animal distributions in novel and dynamic environments. © 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

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@ARTICLE { BabinFortinWilmshurstEtAl2011,
    AUTHOR = { Babin, J.-S. and Fortin, D. and Wilmshurst, J.F. and Fortin, M.-E. },
    TITLE = { Energy gains predict the distribution of plains bison across populations and ecosystems },
    JOURNAL = { Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2011 },
    VOLUME = { 92 },
    PAGES = { 240-252 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { Developing tools that help predict animal distribution in the face of environmental change is central to understanding ecosystem function, but it remains a significant ecological challenge. We tested whether a single foraging currency could explain bison (Bison bison) distribution in dissimilar environments: a largely forested environment in Prince Albert National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada) and a prairie environment in Grasslands National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada). We blended extensive behavioral observations, relocations of radio-collared bison, vegetation surveys, and laboratory analyses to spatially link bison distribution in the two parks and expected gains for different nutritional currencies. In Prince Albert National Park, bison were more closely associated with the distribution of plants that maximized their instantaneous energy intake rate (IDE) than their daily intake of digestible energy. This result reflected both bison's intensity of use of individual meadows and their selection of foraging sites within meadows. On this basis, we tested whether IDE could explain the spatial dynamics of bison reintroduced to Grasslands National Park. As predicted, bison distribution in this park best matched spatial patterns of plants offering rapid IDE rather than rapid sodium intake, phosphorus intake, or daily intake of digestible energy. Because the two study areas have very different plant communities, a phenomenological model of resource selection developed in one area could not be used to predict animal distribution in the other. We were able, however, to successfully infer the distribution of bison from their foraging objective. This consistency in foraging currency across ecosystems and populations provides a strong basis for forecasting animal distributions in novel and dynamic environments. © 2011 by the Ecological Society of America. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 24 May 2011 Source: Scopus CODEN: ECOLA doi: 10.1890/10-0252.1 },
    ISSN = { 00129658 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Animal distribution, Bison, Canada, Food quality, Foraging currencies, Foraging strategy, Forest ecosystem, Generalized estimating equation (GEE), Grassland ecosystem, National Parks, Resource selection functions, Saskatchewan },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2011.05.24 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-79955546482&partnerID=40&md5=eac9980e4077629560bfc13a78dc8912 },
}

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