TwinomugishaBasutaChapman2003

Référence

Twinomugisha, D., Basuta, G.I. and Chapman, C.A. (2003) Status and ecology of the golden monkey (Cercopithecus mitis kandti) in Mgahinga Gorilla National Park, Uganda. African Journal of Ecology, 41(1):47-55. (Scopus )

Résumé

Given the degree to which tropical ecosystems are currently being disturbed by human activities, it is essential to set priorities for conservation and thus it becomes important to consider how best to set these priorities. From this perspective, this study provides the first detailed investigations of Cercopithecus mitis kandti, the golden monkey, focusing on the population in Mgahinga Gorilla National Park (MGNP), Uganda. Specifically, we (1) establish the current status of the golden monkey in terms of population size and distribution within the park in relation to vegetation types and altitude, and (2) investigate the golden monkey's feeding ecology. A total of 67 censuses of 4+km transects were conducted along a cumulative distance of 299 km and 132 social groups were encountered. Densities were estimated to have increased by 1.6 times since a census 8 years ago, and the total population in the park is estimated to be between 3164 and 5059 individuals. The average size of golden monkey groups in MGNP is 30 individuals (range 3-62). This is similar to that of other subspecies in neighbouring forests. In contrast, the census conducted 8 years before estimated average group size to be eight individuals. Golden monkeys were observed to eat 21 plant species and they were inferred to eat an additional eleven from signs left behind and reports. Both study groups relied upon leaves (primarily young leaves), fruits and invertebrates for food, but the amount of time they fed on these different types of foods varied between the groups. Given the apparent increase in density since the census 8 years ago, the golden monkeys of MGNP appear to be doing well. However, given the number of snares and the extent of illegal extraction of bamboo found during the census, conservation efforts should be increased.

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@ARTICLE { TwinomugishaBasutaChapman2003,
    AUTHOR = { Twinomugisha, D. and Basuta, G.I. and Chapman, C.A. },
    TITLE = { Status and ecology of the golden monkey (Cercopithecus mitis kandti) in Mgahinga Gorilla National Park, Uganda },
    JOURNAL = { African Journal of Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2003 },
    VOLUME = { 41 },
    PAGES = { 47--55 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    __MARKEDENTRY = { [Luc:6] },
    ABSTRACT = { Given the degree to which tropical ecosystems are currently being disturbed by human activities, it is essential to set priorities for conservation and thus it becomes important to consider how best to set these priorities. From this perspective, this study provides the first detailed investigations of Cercopithecus mitis kandti, the golden monkey, focusing on the population in Mgahinga Gorilla National Park (MGNP), Uganda. Specifically, we (1) establish the current status of the golden monkey in terms of population size and distribution within the park in relation to vegetation types and altitude, and (2) investigate the golden monkey's feeding ecology. A total of 67 censuses of 4+km transects were conducted along a cumulative distance of 299 km and 132 social groups were encountered. Densities were estimated to have increased by 1.6 times since a census 8 years ago, and the total population in the park is estimated to be between 3164 and 5059 individuals. The average size of golden monkey groups in MGNP is 30 individuals (range 3-62). This is similar to that of other subspecies in neighbouring forests. In contrast, the census conducted 8 years before estimated average group size to be eight individuals. Golden monkeys were observed to eat 21 plant species and they were inferred to eat an additional eleven from signs left behind and reports. Both study groups relied upon leaves (primarily young leaves), fruits and invertebrates for food, but the amount of time they fed on these different types of foods varied between the groups. Given the apparent increase in density since the census 8 years ago, the golden monkeys of MGNP appear to be doing well. However, given the number of snares and the extent of illegal extraction of bamboo found during the census, conservation efforts should be increased. },
    ADDRESS = { University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, United States },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996):5 Export Date: 14 February 2014 Source: Scopus },
    KEYWORDS = { Conservation, Diet, Endangered, Home range, Hybridization },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2014.02.14 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037356104&partnerID=40&md5=8672af8b7dc39d1b16ec5b2d37c8c1b7 },
}

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