MacKenzieSalernoHartterEtAl2017

Référence

MacKenzie, C.A., Salerno, J., Hartter, J., Chapman, C.A., Reyna, R., Tumusiime, D.M. and Drake, M. (2017) Changing perceptions of protected area benefits and problems around Kibale National Park, Uganda. Journal of Environmental Management, 200:217-228. (Scopus )

Résumé

Local residents’ changing perceptions of benefits and problems from living next to a protected area in western Uganda are assessed by comparing household survey data from 2006, 2009, and 2012. Findings are contextualized and supported by long-term data sources for tourism, protected area-based employment, tourism revenue sharing, resource access agreements, and problem animal abundance. We found decreasing perceived benefit and increasing perceived problems associated with the protected area over time, with both trends dominated by increased human-wildlife conflict due to recovering elephant numbers. Proportions of households claiming benefit from specific conservation strategies were increasing, but not enough to offset crop raiding. Ecosystem services mitigated perceptions of problems. As human and animal populations rise, wildlife authorities in Sub-Saharan Africa will be challenged to balance perceptions and adapt policies to ensure the continued existence of protected areas. Understanding the dynamic nature of local people's perceptions provides a tool to adapt protected area management plans, prioritize conservation resources, and engage local communities to support protected areas. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

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@ARTICLE { MacKenzieSalernoHartterEtAl2017,
    AUTHOR = { MacKenzie, C.A. and Salerno, J. and Hartter, J. and Chapman, C.A. and Reyna, R. and Tumusiime, D.M. and Drake, M. },
    TITLE = { Changing perceptions of protected area benefits and problems around Kibale National Park, Uganda },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Environmental Management },
    YEAR = { 2017 },
    VOLUME = { 200 },
    PAGES = { 217-228 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Local residents’ changing perceptions of benefits and problems from living next to a protected area in western Uganda are assessed by comparing household survey data from 2006, 2009, and 2012. Findings are contextualized and supported by long-term data sources for tourism, protected area-based employment, tourism revenue sharing, resource access agreements, and problem animal abundance. We found decreasing perceived benefit and increasing perceived problems associated with the protected area over time, with both trends dominated by increased human-wildlife conflict due to recovering elephant numbers. Proportions of households claiming benefit from specific conservation strategies were increasing, but not enough to offset crop raiding. Ecosystem services mitigated perceptions of problems. As human and animal populations rise, wildlife authorities in Sub-Saharan Africa will be challenged to balance perceptions and adapt policies to ensure the continued existence of protected areas. Understanding the dynamic nature of local people's perceptions provides a tool to adapt protected area management plans, prioritize conservation resources, and engage local communities to support protected areas. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Geography, McGill University, 805 Rue Sherbrooke West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Geography, University of Vermont, 200 Old Mill Building, 94 University Place, Burlington, VT, United States; Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado, Sustainability, Energy, and Environment Complex, 4001 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO, United States; Department of Anthropology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY, United States; Makerere University Biological Field Station, P.O. 409, Fort Portal, Uganda; El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, ECOSUR, Avenida Rancho Poligono 2A, Lerma, Campeche, Mexico },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Adaptive management; Conservation policy; Human-wildlife conflict; Resource access; Species abundance; Tourism revenue sharing },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.05.078 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85020042973&doi=10.1016%2fj.jenvman.2017.05.078&partnerID=40&md5=2a5b313a52ac47702d5df8c57ba811a8 },
}

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