Espinosa-GomezSerio-SilvaSantiago-GarciaEtAl2018

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Espinosa-Gómez, F.C., Serio-Silva, J.C., Santiago-García, J.D., Sandoval-Castro, C.A., Hernández-Salazar, L.T., Mejía-Varas, F., Ojeda-Chávez, J. and Chapman, C.A. (2018) Salivary tannin-binding proteins are a pervasive strategy used by the folivorous/frugivorous black howler monkey. American Journal of Primatology, 80(2). (Scopus )

Résumé

Dietary tannins can affect protein digestion and absorption, be toxic, and influence food selection by being astringent and bitter tasting. Animals that usually ingest tannins may regularly secrete tannin-binding salivary proteins (TBSPs) to counteract the negative effects of tannins or TBSPs production can be induced by a tannin-rich diet. In the wild, many primates regularly eat a diet that contains tannin-rich leaves and unripe fruit and it has been speculated that they have the physiological ability to cope with dietary tannins; however, details of their strategy remains unclear. Our research details the salivary protein composition of wild and zoo-living black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) feeding on natural versus manufactured low-tannin diets, and examines differences in TBSPs, mainly proline-rich proteins (PRPs), to determine whether production of these proteins is dependent on the tannin content of their food. We measured the pH, flow rate, and concentration of total protein and trichloroacetic acid soluble proteins (an index of PRPs) in saliva. Howler monkeys produced slightly alkaline saliva that may aid in the binding interaction between tannin and salivary proteins. We used gel electrophoresis to describe the salivary protein profile and this analysis along with a tannin-binding assay allowed us to detect several TBSPs in all individuals. We found no differences in the characteristics of saliva between wild and zoo-living monkeys. Our results suggest that black howler monkeys always secrete TBSPs even when fed on foods low in tannins. This strategy of constantly using this salivary anti-tannin defense enables them to obtain nutrients from plants that sometimes contain high levels of tannins and may help immediately to overcome the astringent sensation of their food allowing howler monkeys to eat tanniferous plants. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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@ARTICLE { Espinosa-GomezSerio-SilvaSantiago-GarciaEtAl2018,
    AUTHOR = { Espinosa-Gómez, F.C. and Serio-Silva, J.C. and Santiago-García, J.D. and Sandoval-Castro, C.A. and Hernández-Salazar, L.T. and Mejía-Varas, F. and Ojeda-Chávez, J. and Chapman, C.A. },
    TITLE = { Salivary tannin-binding proteins are a pervasive strategy used by the folivorous/frugivorous black howler monkey },
    JOURNAL = { American Journal of Primatology },
    YEAR = { 2018 },
    VOLUME = { 80 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Dietary tannins can affect protein digestion and absorption, be toxic, and influence food selection by being astringent and bitter tasting. Animals that usually ingest tannins may regularly secrete tannin-binding salivary proteins (TBSPs) to counteract the negative effects of tannins or TBSPs production can be induced by a tannin-rich diet. In the wild, many primates regularly eat a diet that contains tannin-rich leaves and unripe fruit and it has been speculated that they have the physiological ability to cope with dietary tannins; however, details of their strategy remains unclear. Our research details the salivary protein composition of wild and zoo-living black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) feeding on natural versus manufactured low-tannin diets, and examines differences in TBSPs, mainly proline-rich proteins (PRPs), to determine whether production of these proteins is dependent on the tannin content of their food. We measured the pH, flow rate, and concentration of total protein and trichloroacetic acid soluble proteins (an index of PRPs) in saliva. Howler monkeys produced slightly alkaline saliva that may aid in the binding interaction between tannin and salivary proteins. We used gel electrophoresis to describe the salivary protein profile and this analysis along with a tannin-binding assay allowed us to detect several TBSPs in all individuals. We found no differences in the characteristics of saliva between wild and zoo-living monkeys. Our results suggest that black howler monkeys always secrete TBSPs even when fed on foods low in tannins. This strategy of constantly using this salivary anti-tannin defense enables them to obtain nutrients from plants that sometimes contain high levels of tannins and may help immediately to overcome the astringent sensation of their food allowing howler monkeys to eat tanniferous plants. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. },
    AFFILIATION = { McGill School of Environment and Department of Anthropology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Red de Biología y Conservación de Vertebrados, Instituto de Ecología AC, Xalapa, Mexico; Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico; Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico; Instituto de Neuroetología, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico; Departamento de Servicios Veterinarios, Zoológico de Zacango, Estado de México, Mexico; Dirección General de Zoológicos y Vida Silvestre, Zoológico de Chapultepec, Ciudad de México, Mexico; Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY, United States; Section of Social Systems Evolution, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan },
    ART_NUMBER = { e22737 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { anti-tannin defense; howler monkeys; physiologic strategy; primate feeding adaptation; salivary proteins },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1002/ajp.22737 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85041004578&doi=10.1002%2fajp.22737&partnerID=40&md5=4e6f78d3da2d8728075e3edc7b92adde },
}

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