ChapmanCorriveauSchoofEtAl2017

Référence

Chapman, C.A., Corriveau, A., Schoof, V.A.M., Twinomugisha, D., Valenta, K. (2017) Long-term simian research sites: Significance for theory and conservation. Journal of Mammalogy, 98(3):652-660. (Scopus )

Résumé

Simian primates (monkeys and apes) are typically long-lived animals with slow life histories. They also have varying social organization and can slowly impact their environment by either being seed dispersers or by overbrowsing their food trees. As a result, short-term studies and those focusing on just 1 location only provide a snapshot of simian life under a specific set of ecological conditions that typically do not represent the complete spatial and temporal picture. Long-term field studies are needed to obtain a true understanding of their behavior, life history, ecology, and the selective pressures acting on them. Fortunately, there have been many long-term studies of simians, so a great deal is known about many species. Here, we consider examples of longterm studies that have operated continuously for approximately a decade or more. We review studies that deal with ecophysiology, social organization, population and community ecology, or conservation. The information emerging from these sites is particularly helpful in the construction of informed conservation plans, which are desperately needed given the severity of threats to simians and the fact that responses do not occur over the duration of a Ph.D. or granting cycle (typically 1-3 years). © 2017 American Society of Mammalogists.

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@ARTICLE { ChapmanCorriveauSchoofEtAl2017,
    AUTHOR = { Chapman, C.A. and Corriveau, A. and Schoof, V.A.M. and Twinomugisha, D. and Valenta, K. },
    TITLE = { Long-term simian research sites: Significance for theory and conservation },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Mammalogy },
    YEAR = { 2017 },
    VOLUME = { 98 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    PAGES = { 652-660 },
    NOTE = { cited By 4 },
    ABSTRACT = { Simian primates (monkeys and apes) are typically long-lived animals with slow life histories. They also have varying social organization and can slowly impact their environment by either being seed dispersers or by overbrowsing their food trees. As a result, short-term studies and those focusing on just 1 location only provide a snapshot of simian life under a specific set of ecological conditions that typically do not represent the complete spatial and temporal picture. Long-term field studies are needed to obtain a true understanding of their behavior, life history, ecology, and the selective pressures acting on them. Fortunately, there have been many long-term studies of simians, so a great deal is known about many species. Here, we consider examples of longterm studies that have operated continuously for approximately a decade or more. We review studies that deal with ecophysiology, social organization, population and community ecology, or conservation. The information emerging from these sites is particularly helpful in the construction of informed conservation plans, which are desperately needed given the severity of threats to simians and the fact that responses do not occur over the duration of a Ph.D. or granting cycle (typically 1-3 years). © 2017 American Society of Mammalogists. },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Anthropology, McGill School of Environment, McGill University, 855 Sherbrooke Street West, Montréal, QC H3A 2T7, Canada; Department of Multidisciplinary Studies, Bilingual Biology Program, Glendon Campus, York University, 2275 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON M4N 3M6, Canada; Department of Zoology, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Conservation; Conservation planning; Diet; Ecophysiology; Ecosystem engineers; Hormones; Life history; Population and community processes; Seed dispersal; Social systems },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1093/jmammal/gyw157 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85042833672&doi=10.1093%2fjmammal%2fgyw157&partnerID=40&md5=9282446222ab86ec45b0773973e80d50 },
}

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