ChapmanChapman1997

Référence

Chapman, C.A., Chapman, L.J. (1997) Forest regeneration in logged and unlogged forests of Kibale National Park, Uganda. Biotropica, 29(4):396-412. (Scopus )

Résumé

Processes of forest regeneration in two unlogged areas and in three areas that were logged nearly 25 years ago were quantified in Kibale National Park, Uganda. For forests to recover from logging, one would predict recruitment and growth processes to be accelerated in logged areas relative to unlogged areas, facilitating increased recruitment of trees into the adult size classes. We examined this prediction first by determining the growth of 4733 trees over a 51 to 56 month period and found that growth rates in the most heavily logged area were consistently slower than in the two unlogged areas. In contrast, the lightly logged forest had similar growth rates to unlogged areas in the small size classes, but trees in the 30 to 50 cm DBH size cohort exhibited elevated growth rates relative to the unlogged areas. Mortality was highest in the heavily logged areas, with many deaths occurring when healthy trees were knocked over by neighboring treefalls. We found no difference in the density or species richness of seedlings in the logged and unlogged forests. The number of seedlings that emerged from the disturbed soil (seed bank+seed rain) and initially seed-free soil (seed rain) was greater in the logged forest than in the unlogged forest. However, sapling density was lower in the heavily logged areas, suggesting that there is a high level of seedling mortality in logged areas. We suggest that the level of canopy opening created during logging, the lack of aggressive colonizing tree species, elephant activity that is concentrated in logged areas, and an aggressive herb community, all combine to delay vegetation recovery in Kibale Forest.

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@ARTICLE { ChapmanChapman1997,
    AUTHOR = { Chapman, C.A. and Chapman, L.J. },
    TITLE = { Forest regeneration in logged and unlogged forests of Kibale National Park, Uganda },
    JOURNAL = { Biotropica },
    YEAR = { 1997 },
    VOLUME = { 29 },
    PAGES = { 396--412 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    __MARKEDENTRY = { [Luc:6] },
    ABSTRACT = { Processes of forest regeneration in two unlogged areas and in three areas that were logged nearly 25 years ago were quantified in Kibale National Park, Uganda. For forests to recover from logging, one would predict recruitment and growth processes to be accelerated in logged areas relative to unlogged areas, facilitating increased recruitment of trees into the adult size classes. We examined this prediction first by determining the growth of 4733 trees over a 51 to 56 month period and found that growth rates in the most heavily logged area were consistently slower than in the two unlogged areas. In contrast, the lightly logged forest had similar growth rates to unlogged areas in the small size classes, but trees in the 30 to 50 cm DBH size cohort exhibited elevated growth rates relative to the unlogged areas. Mortality was highest in the heavily logged areas, with many deaths occurring when healthy trees were knocked over by neighboring treefalls. We found no difference in the density or species richness of seedlings in the logged and unlogged forests. The number of seedlings that emerged from the disturbed soil (seed bank+seed rain) and initially seed-free soil (seed rain) was greater in the logged forest than in the unlogged forest. However, sapling density was lower in the heavily logged areas, suggesting that there is a high level of seedling mortality in logged areas. We suggest that the level of canopy opening created during logging, the lack of aggressive colonizing tree species, elephant activity that is concentrated in logged areas, and an aggressive herb community, all combine to delay vegetation recovery in Kibale Forest. },
    ADDRESS = { Department of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 36211, United States },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996):107 Export Date: 14 February 2014 Source: Scopus },
    KEYWORDS = { Logging, Phenology, Recruitment, Seed dispersal, Seed rain, Tropical forest management, Uganda },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2014.02.14 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0000226810&partnerID=40&md5=82025941b8459359fd70a0852a0a9e4f },
}

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