BonnellGhaiGoldbergEtAl2018

Référence

Bonnell, T.R., Ghai, R.R., Goldberg, T.L., Sengupta, R. and Chapman, C.A. (2018) Spatial configuration becomes more important with increasing habitat loss: a simulation study of environmentally-transmitted parasites. Landscape Ecology, 33(8):1259-1272. (Scopus )

Résumé

Context: Landscape changes can be an important modifier of disease. Habitat fragmentation commonly results in reduced connectivity in host populations and increased use of the remaining habitat. For environmentally transmitted parasites, this presents a possible trade-off between transmission potential at the local and global level. Objectives: We quantify the effects of fragmentation on the transmission of an environmentally transmitted parasite, teasing apart the relative effects of habitat composition and configuration on both host movement behaviour and subsequent infection patterns. Methods: We use a spatially-explicit epidemiological model to simulate the effects of habitat fragmentation, using, as an example, whipworm (Trichuris sp.) within a red colobus monkey population (Procolobus rufomitratus). Results: We found that habitat fragmentation did not always lead to a trade-off between population connectivity and concentration of habitat use in host movement behaviour or in final population infection patterns. However, our simulation results suggest the spatial configuration of the remaining habitat became increasingly influential on behavioural and infection outcomes as habitat was removed. Additionally, we found common fragmentation metrics provided little ability to explain variation in propagation of infections. Conclusions: Our results suggest an interaction between habitat configuration and composition should be considered when assessing disease related impacts of habitat fragmentation on environmentally transmitted parasites, especially in cases where habitat loss is high (≥ 30%). We also propose that spatially-explicit simulations that capture a host’s response to fragmentation could aid in the development of novel landscape metrics targeted towards specific host-parasite-landscape systems. © 2018, Springer Nature B.V.

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@ARTICLE { BonnellGhaiGoldbergEtAl2018,
    AUTHOR = { Bonnell, T.R. and Ghai, R.R. and Goldberg, T.L. and Sengupta, R. and Chapman, C.A. },
    TITLE = { Spatial configuration becomes more important with increasing habitat loss: a simulation study of environmentally-transmitted parasites },
    JOURNAL = { Landscape Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2018 },
    VOLUME = { 33 },
    NUMBER = { 8 },
    PAGES = { 1259-1272 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Context: Landscape changes can be an important modifier of disease. Habitat fragmentation commonly results in reduced connectivity in host populations and increased use of the remaining habitat. For environmentally transmitted parasites, this presents a possible trade-off between transmission potential at the local and global level. Objectives: We quantify the effects of fragmentation on the transmission of an environmentally transmitted parasite, teasing apart the relative effects of habitat composition and configuration on both host movement behaviour and subsequent infection patterns. Methods: We use a spatially-explicit epidemiological model to simulate the effects of habitat fragmentation, using, as an example, whipworm (Trichuris sp.) within a red colobus monkey population (Procolobus rufomitratus). Results: We found that habitat fragmentation did not always lead to a trade-off between population connectivity and concentration of habitat use in host movement behaviour or in final population infection patterns. However, our simulation results suggest the spatial configuration of the remaining habitat became increasingly influential on behavioural and infection outcomes as habitat was removed. Additionally, we found common fragmentation metrics provided little ability to explain variation in propagation of infections. Conclusions: Our results suggest an interaction between habitat configuration and composition should be considered when assessing disease related impacts of habitat fragmentation on environmentally transmitted parasites, especially in cases where habitat loss is high (≥ 30%). We also propose that spatially-explicit simulations that capture a host’s response to fragmentation could aid in the development of novel landscape metrics targeted towards specific host-parasite-landscape systems. © 2018, Springer Nature B.V. },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Psychology, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4, Canada; Department of Environmental Sciences, Emory University, 400 Dowman Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322, United States; Department of Pathobiological Sciences and School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, United States; Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Department of Anthropology and McGill School of Environment, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY, United States; Section of Social Systems Evolution, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Habitat fragmentation; Host movement; Infectious disease; Kibale National Park; Landscape connectivity; Red colobus; Spatially-explicit epidemiological model },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1007/s10980-018-0666-4 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85048277637&doi=10.1007%2fs10980-018-0666-4&partnerID=40&md5=ab1d7bb53550a7504035baad9c90d143 },
}

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