Bonilla-SanchezSerio-SilvaPozo-MontuyEtAl2012

Référence

Bonilla-Sanchez, Y.M., Serio-Silva, J.C., Pozo-Montuy, G., Chapman, C.A. (2012) Howlers Are Able to Survive in Eucalyptus Plantations Where Remnant and Regenerating Vegetation Is Available. International Journal of Primatology, 33(1):233-245. (Scopus )

Résumé

Reversing forest loss through reforestation has become a critical strategy to decrease global climate change, and such programs are more likely to be initiated if they can produce a subsequent monetary gain for the host country. As a result, the planting of monocultures of harvestable trees has become widespread and the practice is accelerating. However, little is known about the effect of such reforestation strategies on biodiversity. Here we quantify the demographic patterns of a population of black howlers (Alouatta pigra) living in a 200-ha eucalyptus plantation with connected remnant forests in southeastern Mexico. We compare our results to data from the literature from forest fragments, extensive forest tracts, and different agrosystems. The howler population inhabiting the plantation grew from 69 individuals in 2007 to 77 in 2008 (11. 6% growth) and to 84 in 2009 (9. 1% growth). During this time the howlers fed extensively on the native vegetation that was growing under the eucalyptus, vines that grew on the plantation trees, and adjacent areas of native secondary growth, but they almost never fed on eucalyptus. Howler density in the plantation was greater than in extensive forest tracts or forest fragments, whereas mean group size was similar to that in the forest tracts and greater than in the fragments and agrosystems. There was no apparent difference in the adult female-to-immature ratio among sites. Our results indicate that plantations that have associated native vegetation can play a positive role in the conservation of this species, but suggest that harvesting regimens must be carefully orchestrated to prevent associated food scarcity. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { Bonilla-SanchezSerio-SilvaPozo-MontuyEtAl2012,
    AUTHOR = { Bonilla-Sanchez, Y.M. and Serio-Silva, J.C. and Pozo-Montuy, G. and Chapman, C.A. },
    TITLE = { Howlers Are Able to Survive in Eucalyptus Plantations Where Remnant and Regenerating Vegetation Is Available },
    JOURNAL = { International Journal of Primatology },
    YEAR = { 2012 },
    VOLUME = { 33 },
    PAGES = { 233-245 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { Reversing forest loss through reforestation has become a critical strategy to decrease global climate change, and such programs are more likely to be initiated if they can produce a subsequent monetary gain for the host country. As a result, the planting of monocultures of harvestable trees has become widespread and the practice is accelerating. However, little is known about the effect of such reforestation strategies on biodiversity. Here we quantify the demographic patterns of a population of black howlers (Alouatta pigra) living in a 200-ha eucalyptus plantation with connected remnant forests in southeastern Mexico. We compare our results to data from the literature from forest fragments, extensive forest tracts, and different agrosystems. The howler population inhabiting the plantation grew from 69 individuals in 2007 to 77 in 2008 (11. 6% growth) and to 84 in 2009 (9. 1% growth). During this time the howlers fed extensively on the native vegetation that was growing under the eucalyptus, vines that grew on the plantation trees, and adjacent areas of native secondary growth, but they almost never fed on eucalyptus. Howler density in the plantation was greater than in extensive forest tracts or forest fragments, whereas mean group size was similar to that in the forest tracts and greater than in the fragments and agrosystems. There was no apparent difference in the adult female-to-immature ratio among sites. Our results indicate that plantations that have associated native vegetation can play a positive role in the conservation of this species, but suggest that harvesting regimens must be carefully orchestrated to prevent associated food scarcity. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. },
    ADDRESS = { Department of Anthropology and McGill School of Environment, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY 10460, United States },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996):5 Export Date: 14 February 2014 Source: Scopus },
    KEYWORDS = { Alouatta pigra, Demography, Eucalyptus, Plantations, Population structure },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2014.02.14 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857141100&partnerID=40&md5=835564ec50afa812bd352ef13d4f402c },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - ABC CBA 2020 ****************** **********************************************************

31 mai au 4 juin 2020

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...