AdamescuPlumptreAbernethyEtAl2018

Référence

Adamescu, G.S., Plumptre, A.J., Abernethy, K.A., Polansky, L., Bush, E.R., Chapman, C.A., Shoo, L.P., Fayolle, A., Janmaat, K.R.L., Robbins, M.M., Ndangalasi, H.J., Cordeiro, N.J., Gilby, I.C., Wittig, R.M., Breuer, T., Hockemba, M.B.-N., Sanz, C.M., Morgan, D.B., Pusey, A.E., Mugerwa, B., Gilagiza, B., Tutin, C., Ewango, C.E.N., Sheil, D., Dimoto, E., Baya, F., Bujo, F., Ssali, F., Dikangadissi, J.-T., Jeffery, K., Valenta, K., White, L., Masozera, M., Wilson, M.L., Bitariho, R., Ndolo Ebika, S.T., Gourlet-Fleury, S., Mulindahabi, F., Beale, C.M. (2018) Annual cycles are the most common reproductive strategy in African tropical tree communities. Biotropica, 50(3):418-430. (Scopus )

Résumé

We present the first cross-continental comparison of the flowering and fruiting phenology of tropical forests across Africa. Flowering events of 5446 trees from 196 species across 12 sites and fruiting events of 4595 trees from 191 species across 11 sites were monitored over periods of 6 to 29 years and analyzed to describe phenology at the continental level. To study phenology, we used Fourier analysis to identify the dominant cycles of flowering and fruiting for each individual tree and we identified the time of year African trees bloom and bear fruit and their relationship to local seasonality. Reproductive strategies were diverse, and no single regular cycle was found in >50% of individuals across all 12 sites. Additionally, we found annual flowering and fruiting cycles to be the most common. Sub-annual cycles were the next most common for flowering, whereas supra-annual patterns were the next most common for fruiting. We also identify variation in different subsets of species, with species exhibiting mainly annual cycles most common in West and West Central African tropical forests, while more species at sites in East Central and East African forests showed cycles ranging from sub-annual to supra-annual. Despite many trees showing strong seasonality, at most sites some flowering and fruiting occurred all year round. Environmental factors with annual cycles are likely to be important drivers of seasonal periodicity in trees across Africa, but proximate triggers are unlikely to be constant across the continent. © 2018 The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation

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@ARTICLE { AdamescuPlumptreAbernethyEtAl2018,
    AUTHOR = { Adamescu, G.S. and Plumptre, A.J. and Abernethy, K.A. and Polansky, L. and Bush, E.R. and Chapman, C.A. and Shoo, L.P. and Fayolle, A. and Janmaat, K.R.L. and Robbins, M.M. and Ndangalasi, H.J. and Cordeiro, N.J. and Gilby, I.C. and Wittig, R.M. and Breuer, T. and Hockemba, M.B.-N. and Sanz, C.M. and Morgan, D.B. and Pusey, A.E. and Mugerwa, B. and Gilagiza, B. and Tutin, C. and Ewango, C.E.N. and Sheil, D. and Dimoto, E. and Baya, F. and Bujo, F. and Ssali, F. and Dikangadissi, J.-T. and Jeffery, K. and Valenta, K. and White, L. and Masozera, M. and Wilson, M.L. and Bitariho, R. and Ndolo Ebika, S.T. and Gourlet-Fleury, S. and Mulindahabi, F. and Beale, C.M. },
    TITLE = { Annual cycles are the most common reproductive strategy in African tropical tree communities },
    JOURNAL = { Biotropica },
    YEAR = { 2018 },
    VOLUME = { 50 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    PAGES = { 418-430 },
    NOTE = { cited By 7 },
    ABSTRACT = { We present the first cross-continental comparison of the flowering and fruiting phenology of tropical forests across Africa. Flowering events of 5446 trees from 196 species across 12 sites and fruiting events of 4595 trees from 191 species across 11 sites were monitored over periods of 6 to 29 years and analyzed to describe phenology at the continental level. To study phenology, we used Fourier analysis to identify the dominant cycles of flowering and fruiting for each individual tree and we identified the time of year African trees bloom and bear fruit and their relationship to local seasonality. Reproductive strategies were diverse, and no single regular cycle was found in >50% of individuals across all 12 sites. Additionally, we found annual flowering and fruiting cycles to be the most common. Sub-annual cycles were the next most common for flowering, whereas supra-annual patterns were the next most common for fruiting. We also identify variation in different subsets of species, with species exhibiting mainly annual cycles most common in West and West Central African tropical forests, while more species at sites in East Central and East African forests showed cycles ranging from sub-annual to supra-annual. Despite many trees showing strong seasonality, at most sites some flowering and fruiting occurred all year round. Environmental factors with annual cycles are likely to be important drivers of seasonal periodicity in trees across Africa, but proximate triggers are unlikely to be constant across the continent. © 2018 The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Biology, University of York, Wentworth Way, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom; Wildlife Conservation Society, 2300 Southern Boulevard, Bronx, NY 10460, United States; Conservation Science Group, Department of Zoology, Cambridge University, Pembroke Rd, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Biological and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, United Kingdom; Institut de Recherche en Ecologie Tropicale, CENAREST, Libreville, BP 842, Gabon; Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, 04103, Germany; Department of Anthropology and McGill School of Environment, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2A7, Canada; Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY 10460, United States; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia; TERRA Teaching and Research Center, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Liège University, Passage des Déportés 2, Gembloux, 5030, Belgium; Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, WX 1012, Netherlands; Department of Botany, University of Dar es Salaam, PO Box 35060, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Department of Biology, Roosevelt University, 430 Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60605, United States; Science and Education, The Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, IL 60605, United States; School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281, United States; Taï Chimpanzee Project, Centre Suisse de Recherches Scientifiques, BP 1303, Abidjan 01, Ivory Coast, Cote d'Ivoire; Mbeli Bai Study, Wildlife Conservation Society – Congo Program, 151 Avenue Charles de Gaulle, Brazzaville, 14537, Democratic Republic Congo; Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, Saint Louis, MO 63130, United States; Congo Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, 151 Avenue de Gaulle, Brazzaville, Democratic Republic Congo; Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes, Lincoln Park Zoo, 2001 North Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60614, United States; Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States; Institute of Tropical Forest Conservation (ITFC), PO BOX 44, Kabale, Uganda; Gombe Stream Research Centre, Kigoma, PO Box 185, Tanzania; Agence Nationale des Parcs Nationaux (ANPN), Libreville, B.P. 20379, Gabon; Ministère des Eaux, Forêts, Chasse et Pêche, Bangui, BP 3314, Central African Republic; Department of Anthropology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, United States; Department of Ecology, Evolution& Behavior, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55108, United States; Initiative des Champignons et des Plantes du Congo (ICPC), Brazzaville, B.P. 2300, Democratic Republic Congo; UPR Bsef, CIRAD, Montpellier, 34398, France; Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, NO-1432, Norway },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Africa; annual cycles; flowers; fruits; phenology; seasonality; tropical forest },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/btp.12561 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85048047781&doi=10.1111%2fbtp.12561&partnerID=40&md5=71a2d007d65945dcd34103720f209b8a },
}

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