TurneyAltshulerWhyteEtAl2018

Reference

Turney, S., Altshuler, I., Whyte, L.G., Buddle, C.M. (2018) Macroinvertebrate and soil prokaryote communities in the forest–tundra ecotone of the Subarctic Yukon. Polar Biology, 41(8):1619-1633. (Scopus )

Abstract

The forest–tundra interface is the world’s largest ecotone, and is globally important due to its biodiversity, climatic sensitivity, and natural resources. The ecological communities which characterize this ecotone, and which provide local and global ecosystem services, are affected by environmental variation at multiple scales. We explored correlations between environmental variables and macroinvertebrate and soil prokaryote communities in the forest–tundra ecotone of the Yukon, Canada. We found that each tussock tundra site possessed a distinct community of macroinvertebrates and prokaryotes, and therefore represented a unique contribution to regional biodiversity. Prokaryote diversity increased with active layer depth, which could be an effect of temperature, or could be evidence of a species-area effect. Prokaryote diversity decreased with lichen cover, which could be due to antimicrobial properties of lichen. The macroinvertebrate community composition was affected by proximity to a human disturbance, the Dempster Highway. Both macroinvertebrate and prokaryote community compositions changed along the latitudinal transect, as the biome transitioned from taiga to tundra. We also found that the abundance of carnivores relative to herbivores decreased with latitude, which adds to recent evidence that predation decreases with latitude. Our survey yielded new insights about how macro- and microorganisms vary together and independently in relation to environmental variables at multiple scales in a forest–tundra ecotone. © 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

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@ARTICLE { TurneyAltshulerWhyteEtAl2018,
    AUTHOR = { Turney, S. and Altshuler, I. and Whyte, L.G. and Buddle, C.M. },
    TITLE = { Macroinvertebrate and soil prokaryote communities in the forest–tundra ecotone of the Subarctic Yukon },
    JOURNAL = { Polar Biology },
    YEAR = { 2018 },
    VOLUME = { 41 },
    NUMBER = { 8 },
    PAGES = { 1619-1633 },
    NOTE = { cited By 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { The forest–tundra interface is the world’s largest ecotone, and is globally important due to its biodiversity, climatic sensitivity, and natural resources. The ecological communities which characterize this ecotone, and which provide local and global ecosystem services, are affected by environmental variation at multiple scales. We explored correlations between environmental variables and macroinvertebrate and soil prokaryote communities in the forest–tundra ecotone of the Yukon, Canada. We found that each tussock tundra site possessed a distinct community of macroinvertebrates and prokaryotes, and therefore represented a unique contribution to regional biodiversity. Prokaryote diversity increased with active layer depth, which could be an effect of temperature, or could be evidence of a species-area effect. Prokaryote diversity decreased with lichen cover, which could be due to antimicrobial properties of lichen. The macroinvertebrate community composition was affected by proximity to a human disturbance, the Dempster Highway. Both macroinvertebrate and prokaryote community compositions changed along the latitudinal transect, as the biome transitioned from taiga to tundra. We also found that the abundance of carnivores relative to herbivores decreased with latitude, which adds to recent evidence that predation decreases with latitude. Our survey yielded new insights about how macro- and microorganisms vary together and independently in relation to environmental variables at multiple scales in a forest–tundra ecotone. © 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University Macdonald Campus, 21 111 Lakeshore Road, St. Anne de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Bacteria; Biodiversity; Community structure; Entomology; Soil ecology; Tundra },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1007/s00300-018-2330-5 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85046535649&doi=10.1007%2fs00300-018-2330-5&partnerID=40&md5=bba94b5f946fb8ffc704587a9ce3f204 },
}

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