BowdenHoyeBuddle2013

Reference

Bowden, J.J., Hoye, T.T. and Buddle, C.M. (2013) Fecundity and sexual size dimorphism of wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) along an elevational gradient in the Arctic. Polar Biology, 36(6):831-836. (Scopus )

Abstract

Fecundity and body size are central fitness-related traits, and their intra-specific responses to environmental variation are receiving increasing attention in the context of climate change. Recent results from Greenland indicate that temporal and spatial variation in body size differences between sexes (sexual size dimorphism) may be widespread among wolf spider species and could be related to climate. Here, we tested whether variation in elevation affected body size of three wolf spider (Araneae: Lycosidae) species in low-Arctic Canada, whether the sexes differed in their response to the cline, and whether changes in local density influenced this relationship. We also tested whether fecundity changed with elevation in two of the species, independent of body size variation. We found a significant sex-elevation interaction for Pardosa lapponica: female size decreased more in response to elevation than that of males. Males and females of Pardosa uintana decreased significantly in size with elevation at a similar rate. Alopecosa aculeata males increased in body size along the gradient while females did not. Pardosa lapponica females, but not P. uintana females, showed significant reduction in fecundity in response to elevation. P. uintana showed significant decreases in body size with increases in its population density. Changes in temperature and potential resource availability along the elevational gradient are probably causing these species- and sex-specific responses. Further summer warming of the region may alleviate current constraints on growth and reproduction of these species although sex-specific responses may affect their population dynamics. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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@ARTICLE { BowdenHoyeBuddle2013,
    AUTHOR = { Bowden, J.J. and Hoye, T.T. and Buddle, C.M. },
    TITLE = { Fecundity and sexual size dimorphism of wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) along an elevational gradient in the Arctic },
    JOURNAL = { Polar Biology },
    YEAR = { 2013 },
    VOLUME = { 36 },
    PAGES = { 831-836 },
    NUMBER = { 6 },
    ABSTRACT = { Fecundity and body size are central fitness-related traits, and their intra-specific responses to environmental variation are receiving increasing attention in the context of climate change. Recent results from Greenland indicate that temporal and spatial variation in body size differences between sexes (sexual size dimorphism) may be widespread among wolf spider species and could be related to climate. Here, we tested whether variation in elevation affected body size of three wolf spider (Araneae: Lycosidae) species in low-Arctic Canada, whether the sexes differed in their response to the cline, and whether changes in local density influenced this relationship. We also tested whether fecundity changed with elevation in two of the species, independent of body size variation. We found a significant sex-elevation interaction for Pardosa lapponica: female size decreased more in response to elevation than that of males. Males and females of Pardosa uintana decreased significantly in size with elevation at a similar rate. Alopecosa aculeata males increased in body size along the gradient while females did not. Pardosa lapponica females, but not P. uintana females, showed significant reduction in fecundity in response to elevation. P. uintana showed significant decreases in body size with increases in its population density. Changes in temperature and potential resource availability along the elevational gradient are probably causing these species- and sex-specific responses. Further summer warming of the region may alleviate current constraints on growth and reproduction of these species although sex-specific responses may affect their population dynamics. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 2 July 2013 Source: Scopus CODEN: POBID :doi 10.1007/s00300-013-1308-6 },
    ISSN = { 07224060 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Alopecosa, Altitudinal gradient, Body size, Pardosa, Yukon Territory, body size, elevation, environmental change, environmental gradient, fecundity, fitness, life history trait, population dynamics, resource availability, sex-related difference, sexual dimorphism, spider, temperature effect, Arctic, Canada, Canadian Arctic, Yukon Territory, Aculeata, Alopecosa, Araneae, Lycosidae, Pardosa, Pardosa uintana },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2013.07.02 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84877630129&partnerID=40&md5=e7d1bfc7d09d0f2c17b77214f688dbd5 },
}

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