ZhaoPengXiangEtAl2013

Référence

Zhao, M., Peng, C., Xiang, W., Deng, X., Tian, D., Zhou, X., Yu, G., He, H., Zhao, Z. (2013) Plant phenological modeling and its application in global climate change research: Overview and future challenges. Environmental Reviews, 21(1):1-14. (Scopus )

Résumé

Plants interact to the seasonality of their environments, and changes in plant phenology have long been regarded as sensitive indicators of climatic change. Plant phenology modeling has been shown to be the simplest and most useful tool to assess phenol-climate shifts. Temperature, solar radiation, and water availability are assumed to be the key factors that control plant phenology. Statistical, mechanistic, and theoretical approaches have often been used for the parameterization of plant phenology models. The statistical approaches correlate the timing of phenological events to environmental factors or heat unit accumulations. The approaches have the simplified calculation procedures, correct phenological mechanism assumptions, but limited applications and predictive abilities. The mechanistic approaches describe plant phenology with the known or assumed "cause-effect relationships" between biological processes and key driving variables. The mechanistic approaches have the improved parameter processes, realistic assumptions, broad applications, and effective predictions. The theoretical approaches assume cost-benefit tradeoff strategies in trees. These methods are capable of capturing and quantifying the potential impacts and consequences of global climate change and human activity. However, certain limitations still exist related to our understanding of phenological mechanisms in relation to (1) interactions between plants and their specific climates, (2) the integration of both field observational and remote sensing data with plant phenology models across taxa and ecosystem type, (3) amplitude clarification of scale-related sensitivity to global climate change, and (4) improvements in parameterization processes and the overall reduction of modeling uncertainties to forecast impacts of future climate change on plant phenological dynamics. To improve our capacity in the prediction of the amplitude of plant phenological responses with regard to both structural and functional sensitivity to future global climate change, it is important to refine modeling methodologies by applying long-term and large-scale observational data. It is equally important to consider other less used but critical factors (such as heredity, pests, and anthropogenic drivers), apply advanced model parameterization and data assimilation techniques, incorporate process-based plant phenology models as a dynamic component into global vegetation dynamic models, and test plant phenology models against long-term ground observations and high-resolution satellite data across different spatial and temporal scales. © 2013 Published by NRC Research Press.

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@ARTICLE { ZhaoPengXiangEtAl2013,
    AUTHOR = { Zhao, M. and Peng, C. and Xiang, W. and Deng, X. and Tian, D. and Zhou, X. and Yu, G. and He, H. and Zhao, Z. },
    TITLE = { Plant phenological modeling and its application in global climate change research: Overview and future challenges },
    JOURNAL = { Environmental Reviews },
    YEAR = { 2013 },
    VOLUME = { 21 },
    PAGES = { 1-14 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { Plants interact to the seasonality of their environments, and changes in plant phenology have long been regarded as sensitive indicators of climatic change. Plant phenology modeling has been shown to be the simplest and most useful tool to assess phenol-climate shifts. Temperature, solar radiation, and water availability are assumed to be the key factors that control plant phenology. Statistical, mechanistic, and theoretical approaches have often been used for the parameterization of plant phenology models. The statistical approaches correlate the timing of phenological events to environmental factors or heat unit accumulations. The approaches have the simplified calculation procedures, correct phenological mechanism assumptions, but limited applications and predictive abilities. The mechanistic approaches describe plant phenology with the known or assumed "cause-effect relationships" between biological processes and key driving variables. The mechanistic approaches have the improved parameter processes, realistic assumptions, broad applications, and effective predictions. The theoretical approaches assume cost-benefit tradeoff strategies in trees. These methods are capable of capturing and quantifying the potential impacts and consequences of global climate change and human activity. However, certain limitations still exist related to our understanding of phenological mechanisms in relation to (1) interactions between plants and their specific climates, (2) the integration of both field observational and remote sensing data with plant phenology models across taxa and ecosystem type, (3) amplitude clarification of scale-related sensitivity to global climate change, and (4) improvements in parameterization processes and the overall reduction of modeling uncertainties to forecast impacts of future climate change on plant phenological dynamics. To improve our capacity in the prediction of the amplitude of plant phenological responses with regard to both structural and functional sensitivity to future global climate change, it is important to refine modeling methodologies by applying long-term and large-scale observational data. It is equally important to consider other less used but critical factors (such as heredity, pests, and anthropogenic drivers), apply advanced model parameterization and data assimilation techniques, incorporate process-based plant phenology models as a dynamic component into global vegetation dynamic models, and test plant phenology models against long-term ground observations and high-resolution satellite data across different spatial and temporal scales. © 2013 Published by NRC Research Press. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 7 May 2013 Source: Scopus CODEN: ENRVE :doi 10.1139/er-2012-0036 },
    ISSN = { 11818700 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Climate change, Ecological forecasting, NDVI, Plant phenology, Process-based model, Cause-effect relationships, Data assimilation techniques, Ecological forecasting, Functional sensitivities, NDVI, Plant phenology, Process-based models, Spatial and temporal scale, Biology, Climate models, Data integration, Ecology, Forecasting, Forestry, Parameterization, Sun, Uncertainty analysis, Climate change, Biology, Climates, Ecology, Forecasts, Forestry, Models },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2013.05.07 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84875792933&partnerID=40&md5=b7a642ad1b759d42e46f25d1934a1244 },
}

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