MinJinChangEtAl2011

Référence

Min, Y., Jin, X., Chang, J., Peng, C., Gu, B., Ge, Y., Zhong, Y. (2011) Weak indirect effects inherent to nitrogen biogeochemical cycling within anthropogenic ecosystems: A network environ analysis. Ecological Modelling, 222(17):3277-3284. (Scopus )

Résumé

Indirect effects are assumed to be the major causes of the complexity and stability of ecological networks. The complexity of urban-rural complexes (URCs) could also be attributed to the indirect effects associated with human activities. No studies, however, have quantified the strength of indirect effects in relation to urban biogeochemistry. A network environ analysis (NEA) was used for this study to investigate and compare indirect effects in relation to the nitrogen (N) cycling networks of 22 natural ecosystems and five URCs. Results show that indirect effects were proven to be weak for URC N cycling networks (accounting for only ~2% of the overall effects measured in natural ecosystems). The weak indirect effects found provide a counterexample for the hypothesis that indirect effects are in fact the dominant components of biogeochemical networks. It also implies that human activity in itself does not always raise the complexity of ecological processes as previously suggested. Weak indirect effects also lead to perturbation fragility for URC N cycles (where the decay rate is greater in comparison to natural ecosystems by a factor of 13). In order to improve the robustness and efficiency of URC biogeochemical cycling, a knockout analysis was carried out. By comparing results after removing single interactions between natural ecosystems and URCs it was found that the loss of indirect effects require cooperative strategies to optimize N cycling networks within URCs. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

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@ARTICLE { MinJinChangEtAl2011,
    AUTHOR = { Min, Y. and Jin, X. and Chang, J. and Peng, C. and Gu, B. and Ge, Y. and Zhong, Y. },
    TITLE = { Weak indirect effects inherent to nitrogen biogeochemical cycling within anthropogenic ecosystems: A network environ analysis },
    JOURNAL = { Ecological Modelling },
    YEAR = { 2011 },
    VOLUME = { 222 },
    PAGES = { 3277-3284 },
    NUMBER = { 17 },
    ABSTRACT = { Indirect effects are assumed to be the major causes of the complexity and stability of ecological networks. The complexity of urban-rural complexes (URCs) could also be attributed to the indirect effects associated with human activities. No studies, however, have quantified the strength of indirect effects in relation to urban biogeochemistry. A network environ analysis (NEA) was used for this study to investigate and compare indirect effects in relation to the nitrogen (N) cycling networks of 22 natural ecosystems and five URCs. Results show that indirect effects were proven to be weak for URC N cycling networks (accounting for only ~2% of the overall effects measured in natural ecosystems). The weak indirect effects found provide a counterexample for the hypothesis that indirect effects are in fact the dominant components of biogeochemical networks. It also implies that human activity in itself does not always raise the complexity of ecological processes as previously suggested. Weak indirect effects also lead to perturbation fragility for URC N cycles (where the decay rate is greater in comparison to natural ecosystems by a factor of 13). In order to improve the robustness and efficiency of URC biogeochemical cycling, a knockout analysis was carried out. By comparing results after removing single interactions between natural ecosystems and URCs it was found that the loss of indirect effects require cooperative strategies to optimize N cycling networks within URCs. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 16 May 2012 Source: Scopus CODEN: ECMOD doi: 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2011.06.013 },
    ISSN = { 03043800 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Cascading effects, Complexity, Ecological network, Fragility, Urban, Cascading effects, Complexity, Ecological networks, Fragility, Urban, Analytical geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, Complexation, Decay (organic), Ecosystems, biogeochemistry, complexity, ecological approach, human activity, hypothesis testing, nitrogen cycle, optimization, perturbation, rural-urban comparison },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2012.05.16 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-80051917312&partnerID=40&md5=41a98d57c09d2badc432a032487bf435 },
}

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