HolmesKirbyPotvin2017

Référence

Holmes, I., Kirby, K.R., Potvin, C. (2017) Agroforestry within REDD+: experiences of an indigenous Embera community in Panama. Agroforestry Systems, 91(6):1181-1197. (URL )

Résumé

Reducing carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) has become central to efforts to mitigate climate change. Approximately 10 {\%} of the world's forests are managed by local and indigenous peoples. Agroforestry may provide these communities with a means to engage in carbon offsetting initiatives without forfeiting access to, or benefits from, forests. Here, we present an analysis of social and ecological data from a four-year-old, reforestation-based carbon-offset project on the collective lands of Ipet{\'i}-Ember{\'a}, Panama. Mixed-species agroforests or timber-only plots were established by a subset of community members under voluntary carbon-offset agreements with a private client. We (1) describe how plot carbon accumulation trajectories were related to species composition; (2) determine if established agroforests are likely to meet carbon sequestration targets by the end of the 25-year project period; (3) describe the motivations and experiences of participants who chose to establish agroforests; and (4) compare socio-economics of participants versus non-participants. Our study provides data on early mortality, tree growth and the carbon sequestration capacity of 29 species that are commonly used by small farming households in Latin America and elsewhere. The study highlights strategies for reducing risks associated with agroforestry as a carbon sequestration strategy in the context of carbon offset projects, such as the replanting of dead trees and the establishment of a carbon buffer. We also provide evidence to counter claims that offset projects could amplify inequality in rural communities as participants to agroforestry, when compared to non-participants, were not remarkable in terms of their assets or wealth. Overall, this case study provides an encouraging example of how agroforestry may help forest communities engage with REDD+ in a way that benefits both their livelihoods and the global climate change agenda.

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@ARTICLE { HolmesKirbyPotvin2017,
    AUTHOR = { Holmes, I. and Kirby, K.R. and Potvin, C. },
    TITLE = { Agroforestry within REDD+: experiences of an indigenous Embera community in Panama },
    JOURNAL = { Agroforestry Systems },
    YEAR = { 2017 },
    VOLUME = { 91 },
    NUMBER = { 6 },
    PAGES = { 1181--1197 },
    MONTH = { Dec },
    ISSN = { 1572-9680 },
    ABSTRACT = { Reducing carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) has become central to efforts to mitigate climate change. Approximately 10 {\%} of the world's forests are managed by local and indigenous peoples. Agroforestry may provide these communities with a means to engage in carbon offsetting initiatives without forfeiting access to, or benefits from, forests. Here, we present an analysis of social and ecological data from a four-year-old, reforestation-based carbon-offset project on the collective lands of Ipet{\'i}-Ember{\'a}, Panama. Mixed-species agroforests or timber-only plots were established by a subset of community members under voluntary carbon-offset agreements with a private client. We (1) describe how plot carbon accumulation trajectories were related to species composition; (2) determine if established agroforests are likely to meet carbon sequestration targets by the end of the 25-year project period; (3) describe the motivations and experiences of participants who chose to establish agroforests; and (4) compare socio-economics of participants versus non-participants. Our study provides data on early mortality, tree growth and the carbon sequestration capacity of 29 species that are commonly used by small farming households in Latin America and elsewhere. The study highlights strategies for reducing risks associated with agroforestry as a carbon sequestration strategy in the context of carbon offset projects, such as the replanting of dead trees and the establishment of a carbon buffer. We also provide evidence to counter claims that offset projects could amplify inequality in rural communities as participants to agroforestry, when compared to non-participants, were not remarkable in terms of their assets or wealth. Overall, this case study provides an encouraging example of how agroforestry may help forest communities engage with REDD+ in a way that benefits both their livelihoods and the global climate change agenda. },
    DAY = { 01 },
    DOI = { 10.1007/s10457-016-0003-3 },
    OWNER = { Daniel Lesieur },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2018-09-19 },
    URL = { https://doi.org/10.1007/s10457-016-0003-3 },
}

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