ShipleyMeziane2002

Référence

Shipley, B. and Meziane, D. (2002) The balanced-growth hypothesis and the allometry of leaf and root biomass allocation. Functional Ecology, 16(3):326-331.

Résumé

1. Many ecological models of plant growth assume balanced growth: that biomass is allocated preferentially to leaves or roots to increase capture of the limiting external resource. An alternative explanation is based on nonlinear (allometric) allocation as a function of plant size. The objective of this study was to test between these two alternative explanations. 2. A total of 1150 plants from 22 different herbaceous species were grown in hydroponic sand culture in factorial combinations of high (1100 ?mol m-2 s-1) and low (200 ?mol m-2 s-1 PAR) irradiance crossed with a full-strength and a 1/6 dilution of Hoagland's hydroponic solution. Plants were harvested at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 days postgermination, and dry mass was determined for leaf and root components. These data were used to test the hypotheses of balanced growth and of allometric allocation. 3. Both irradiance and nutrient supply affected the slope and intercept of the root: shoot allometry, contrary to the allometric hypothesis but in agreement with the hypothesis of balanced growth; decreased nutrient supply increased allocation to roots; and decreased irradiance increased allocation to leaves. 4. Plants allocated relatively more biomass to roots than to leaves as plants grew larger. In order for the balanced-growth hypothesis to be correct, the net rate of nutrient uptake per unit root mass must have been decreasing relative to the net rate of carbon gain per unit leaf mass. 5. We suggest two reasons why this might be the case: (i) older roots decreased their efficiency of nutrient uptake; and (ii) larger root systems more rapidly decreased the available nutrients between flushes of hydroponic solution. 6. These results support the notion of balanced growth that is found in many ecological models of plant growth.

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@ARTICLE { ShipleyMeziane2002,
    AUTHOR = { Shipley, B. and Meziane, D. },
    TITLE = { The balanced-growth hypothesis and the allometry of leaf and root biomass allocation },
    JOURNAL = { Functional Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2002 },
    VOLUME = { 16 },
    PAGES = { 326-331 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    NOTE = { 02698463 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 30 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: FECOE doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2435.2002.00626.x Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Shipley, B.; De?partement de Biologie; Universite? de Sherbrooke Sherbrooke, Que. JIK 2R1, Canada; email: bshipley@courrier.usherb.ca References: Aarssen, L.W., Taylor, D.R., Fecundity allocation in herbaceous plants (1992) Oikos, 65, pp. 225-232; Bazzaz, F.A., Chiariello, N.R., Coley, P.D., Pitelka, L.F., Allocation resources to reproduction and defense (1987) Bioscience, 37, pp. 58-67; Clarkson, D.T., Root structure and sites of ion uptake (1996) Plant Roots, the Hidden Half, pp. 483-510. , eds Y. Waisel, A. Eshel \& U. Kafkafi. Marcel Dekker, New York; Davidson, R.L., Effect of root/leaf temperature differentials on root/shoot ratios in some pasture grasses and clover (1969) Annals of Botany, 33, pp. 561-569; Garnier, E., Resource capture, biomass allocation and growth in herbaceous plants (1991) Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 6, pp. 126-131; Grime, J.P., Evidence for the existence of three primary strategies in plants and its relevence to ecological and evolutionary theory (1977) American Naturalist, 111, pp. 1169-1194; Grime, J.P., (1979) Plant Strategies and Vegetation Processes, , John Wiley and Sons, New York; Hilbert, D.W., Optimization of plant root: Shoot ratios and internal nitrogen concentration (1990) Annals of Botany, 66, pp. 91-99; Hunt, R., Further observations on root-shoot equilibria in perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) (1975) Annals of Botany, 39, pp. 745-755; Hunt, R., Lloyd, P.S., Growth and partitioning (1987) New Phytologist, 106 (SUPPL.), pp. 235-249; Hunt, R., Nicholls, A.O., Stress and the coarse control of growth and root-shoot partitioning in herbaceous plants (1986) Oikos, 47, pp. 149-158; Hunt, R., Nicholls, A.O., Fathy, S.A., Growth and root-shoot partitioning in eighteen British grasses (1987) Oikos, 50, pp. 53-59; Lovett Doust, J., Plant reproductive strategies and resource allocation (1989) Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 5, pp. 230-380; Meziane, D., Shipley, B., Interacting components of interspecific relative growth rate: Constancy and change under differing conditions of light and nutrient supply (1999) Functional Ecology, 13, pp. 611-622; Mu?ller, I., Schmid, B., Weiner, J., The effect of nutrient availability on biomass allocation patterns in 27 species of herbaceous plants (2000) Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 3, pp. 115-127; Perrin, N., Optimal resource allocation and the marginal value of organs (1992) Americain Naturalist, 139, pp. 1344-1369; Robinson, D., Limits to nutrient inflow rates in roots and root systems (1986) Physiologia Plantarum, 68, pp. 551-559; Shipley, B., Hunt, R., Regression smoothers for estimating parameters of growth analyses (1996) Annals of Botany, 76, pp. 569-576; Shipley, B., Peters, R.H., A test of the Tilman model of plant strategies: Relative growth rate and biomass partitioning (1990) American Naturalist, 136, pp. 139-153; (1999) S-PLUS 2000 User's Guide, , MathSoft, Seattle, WA; Thornley, J.H.M., Modelling shoot/root relations: The only way to forward? (1998) Annals of Botany, 81, pp. 165-171; Tilman, D., (1988) Plant Strategies and the Dynamics and Structure of Plant Communities, , Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ; Tilman, D., Constraints and tradeoffs: Toward a predictive theory of competition and succession (1990) Oikos, 58, pp. 3-15; Westoby, M., A leaf-height-seed (LHS) plant ecology strategy scheme (1998) Plant and Soil, 199, pp. 213-227. },
    ABSTRACT = { 1. Many ecological models of plant growth assume balanced growth: that biomass is allocated preferentially to leaves or roots to increase capture of the limiting external resource. An alternative explanation is based on nonlinear (allometric) allocation as a function of plant size. The objective of this study was to test between these two alternative explanations. 2. A total of 1150 plants from 22 different herbaceous species were grown in hydroponic sand culture in factorial combinations of high (1100 ?mol m-2 s-1) and low (200 ?mol m-2 s-1 PAR) irradiance crossed with a full-strength and a 1/6 dilution of Hoagland's hydroponic solution. Plants were harvested at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 days postgermination, and dry mass was determined for leaf and root components. These data were used to test the hypotheses of balanced growth and of allometric allocation. 3. Both irradiance and nutrient supply affected the slope and intercept of the root: shoot allometry, contrary to the allometric hypothesis but in agreement with the hypothesis of balanced growth; decreased nutrient supply increased allocation to roots; and decreased irradiance increased allocation to leaves. 4. Plants allocated relatively more biomass to roots than to leaves as plants grew larger. In order for the balanced-growth hypothesis to be correct, the net rate of nutrient uptake per unit root mass must have been decreasing relative to the net rate of carbon gain per unit leaf mass. 5. We suggest two reasons why this might be the case: (i) older roots decreased their efficiency of nutrient uptake; and (ii) larger root systems more rapidly decreased the available nutrients between flushes of hydroponic solution. 6. These results support the notion of balanced growth that is found in many ecological models of plant growth. },
    KEYWORDS = { Allometry Balanced growth Biomass allocation Light limitation Nutrient limitation Plant-growth strategies biomass allocation growth irradiance nutrient limitation },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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