MezianeShipley1999a

Référence

Meziane, D. and Shipley, B. (1999) Interacting components of interspecific relative growth rate: Constancy and change under differing conditions of light and nutrient supply. Functional Ecology, 13(5):611-622.

Résumé

1. One thousand three hundred and twenty plants from 22 species of herbaceous angiosperms, typical of open sunny habitats, were grown from seed for 35 days under controlled conditions in four experimental environments: high (1100 ?mol m-2 s-1 PAR) and low (200 ?mol m-2 s-1 PAR) light, combined with high (full-strength) and low (1/6 dilution) levels of hydroponic nutrient solution. Plants of each species were harvested at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 days post-germination. 2. Relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR), specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf mass ratio (LWR) were estimated for each species in each treatment combination. 3. Both light and nutrient levels affected RGR and each of the growth components. Average NAR increased, while SLA and LWR decreased, with increasing light. Increasing nutrient levels increased all three growth components. Light and nutrient levels interacted in their effects on NAR and SLA, but not in their effects on LWR. 4. Those species having the highest RGR in the most productive environment were most severely depressed in the less productive environments. This same pattern also occurred with NAR and SLA, but not with LWR. 5. The rank order of species with respect to SLA and LWR remained similar across the treatment environments; with respect to NAR the rank order remained similar in only four of the six treatment contrasts; with respect to RGR the rank order remained similar in only two of the six treatment contrasts and the rank order actually reversed in one treatment contrast. 6. RGR did not display strong bivariate correlations with any of the growth components in any of the treatment groups. It had positive, moderately strong correlations with NAR but only in the low-nutrient treatments. It had positive, moderately strong correlations with LWR only in the high-nutrient treatments. After controlling for the other growth components, each showed strong positive relationships with RGR. Furthermore, the effects of the treatments disappeared after controlling for the components, showing that the treatment effects were completely mediated through their effects on these underlying components. 7. There were also strong negative partial correlations between each of the growth components. These compensatory relationships buffered RGR from large changes in response to changing environments.

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@ARTICLE { MezianeShipley1999a,
    AUTHOR = { Meziane, D. and Shipley, B. },
    TITLE = { Interacting components of interspecific relative growth rate: Constancy and change under differing conditions of light and nutrient supply },
    JOURNAL = { Functional Ecology },
    YEAR = { 1999 },
    VOLUME = { 13 },
    PAGES = { 611-622 },
    NUMBER = { 5 },
    NOTE = { 02698463 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 27 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: FECOE doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2435.1999.00359.x Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Meziane, D.; Departement de Biologie; Universite de Sherbrooke Sherbrooke, Que. J1K 2R1, Canada References: Bourdot, G.W., Seville, D.J., Field, R.J., The response of Achillea millefolium L. (Yarrow) to shading (1984) New Phytologist, 97, pp. 653-663; Coleman, J.S., McConnaughay, D.M., Ackerly, D.D., Interpreting phenotypic variation in plants (1994) TREE, 9, pp. 187-191; Eagles, C.F., The effect of temperature on vegetative growth in climatic races of Dactylis glomerata in controlled environments (1967) Annals of Botany, 31, pp. 31-39; Garnier, E., Growth analysis of congeneric annual and perennial grass species (1992) Journal of Ecology, 80, pp. 665-675; Gleason, H.A., Cronquist, A., (1991) Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada, 2nd Edn., , The New York Botanical Garden, New York; Grime, J.P., (1979) Plant Strategies and Vegetation Processes, , John Wiley and Sons, New York; Grime, J.P., Hunt, R., Relative growth-rate: Its range and adaptive significance in a local flora (1975) Journal of Ecology, 63, pp. 393-422; Hunt, R., (1982) Plant Growth Curves. The Functional Approach to Plant Growth Analysis, , Edward Arnold, London; Hunt, R., Cornelissen, J.H.C., Components of relative growth rate and their interrelations in 59 temperate plant species (1997) New Phytologist, 135, pp. 395-417; Hunt, R., Neal, A.M., Laffarga, J., Montserrat-Marti, G., Stockey, A., Whitehouse, J., Mean relative growth rate (1993) Methods in Comparative Plant Ecology, pp. 98-102. , (eds G. A. F. Hendry \& J. P. Grime), Chapman \& Hall, London; Konings, H., Verhoeven, J.T.A., De Groot, R., Growth characteristics and seasonal allocation patterns of biomass and nutrients in Carex species growing in floating fens (1992) Plant and Soil, 147, pp. 183-196; Krzanowski, W.J., Permutation tests for correlation matrices (1993) Statistics and Computing, 3, pp. 37-44; Lambers, H., Poorter, H., Inherent variation in growth rate between higher plants: A search for physiological causes and ecological consequences (1992) Advanced Ecological Research, 23, pp. 187-261; McKenna, M.F., Shipley, B., Interacting determinants of interspecific relative growth rate: Empirical patterns and a theoretical explanation (1999) Ecoscience, 6. , in press; Meziane, D., (1998) Effet de la Richesse en Azote et de la Lumie?re Sur Le Vitesse de Croissance Spe?cifique Chez 22 Espe?ces Herbace?es. Importance des E?changes Gazeux et de la Morphologie, , PhD thesis, Universite? de Sherbrooke, Que?bec, Canada; Meziane, D., Shipley, B., Interacting determinants of specific leaf area in 22 herbaceous species: Effects of irradiance and nutrient supply (1999) Plant, Cell and Environment, 22, pp. 447-459; Osunkoya, O.O., Ash, J.E., Hopkins, M.S., Graham, A.W., Influence of seed size and seedling ecological attributes on shade-tolerance of rain-forest tree species in northern Queensland (1994) Journal of Ecology, 82, pp. 149-163; Pons, T.L., An ecophysiological study in the field layer of ash coppice. II (1977) Acta Botanica Neerlandica, 26, pp. 29-42; Poorter, H., Interspecific variation in relative growth rate: On ecological causes and physiological consequences (1989) Causes and Consequences of Variation in Growth Rate and Productivity of Higher Plants, pp. 45-68. , (eds H. Lambers, J. L. Cambridge, H. Konings \& T. L. Pons), SPB Academic Publishing, The Hague; Poorter, H., Pothmann, P., Growth and carbon economy of a fast-growing and a slow-growing grass species as dependent on ontogeny (1992) New Phytologist, 120, pp. 159-166; Poorter, H., Remkes, C., Leaf area ratio and net assimilation rate of 24 species differing in relative growth rate (1990) Oecologia, 83, pp. 553-559; Potter, J.R., Jones, J.W., Leaf area partitioning as an important factor in plant growth (1977) Plant Physiology, 59, pp. 10-14; (1989) SAS User's Guide, Version 6, , SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC; Shaw, R.G., Mitchell-Olds, T., ANOVA for unbalanced data: An overview (1993) Ecology, 74, pp. 1638-1645; Shipley, B., Keddy, P.A., The relationship between relative growth rate and sensitivity to nutrient stress in twenty-eight species of emergent macrophytes (1988) Journal of Ecology, 76, pp. 1101-1110; Shipley, B., Peters, R.H., A test of the Tilman model of plant strategies: Relative growth rate and biomass partitioning (1990) American Naturalist, 136, pp. 139-153; Tilman, D., (1988) Plant Strategies and the Dynamics and Structure of Plant Communities, , Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ; Walters, M.B., Kruger, E.L., Reich, P.B., Relative growth rate in relation to physiological and morphological traits for northern hardwood tree seedlings: Species, light environment and ontogenetic considerations (1993) Oecologia, 96, pp. 219-231. },
    ABSTRACT = { 1. One thousand three hundred and twenty plants from 22 species of herbaceous angiosperms, typical of open sunny habitats, were grown from seed for 35 days under controlled conditions in four experimental environments: high (1100 ?mol m-2 s-1 PAR) and low (200 ?mol m-2 s-1 PAR) light, combined with high (full-strength) and low (1/6 dilution) levels of hydroponic nutrient solution. Plants of each species were harvested at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 days post-germination. 2. Relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR), specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf mass ratio (LWR) were estimated for each species in each treatment combination. 3. Both light and nutrient levels affected RGR and each of the growth components. Average NAR increased, while SLA and LWR decreased, with increasing light. Increasing nutrient levels increased all three growth components. Light and nutrient levels interacted in their effects on NAR and SLA, but not in their effects on LWR. 4. Those species having the highest RGR in the most productive environment were most severely depressed in the less productive environments. This same pattern also occurred with NAR and SLA, but not with LWR. 5. The rank order of species with respect to SLA and LWR remained similar across the treatment environments; with respect to NAR the rank order remained similar in only four of the six treatment contrasts; with respect to RGR the rank order remained similar in only two of the six treatment contrasts and the rank order actually reversed in one treatment contrast. 6. RGR did not display strong bivariate correlations with any of the growth components in any of the treatment groups. It had positive, moderately strong correlations with NAR but only in the low-nutrient treatments. It had positive, moderately strong correlations with LWR only in the high-nutrient treatments. After controlling for the other growth components, each showed strong positive relationships with RGR. Furthermore, the effects of the treatments disappeared after controlling for the components, showing that the treatment effects were completely mediated through their effects on these underlying components. 7. There were also strong negative partial correlations between each of the growth components. These compensatory relationships buffered RGR from large changes in response to changing environments. },
    KEYWORDS = { Leaf mass ratio Net assimilation rate Relative growth rate Specific leaf area environmental conditions growth rate light nutrient availability },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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