St-Onge2005

Référence

St-Onge, B. (2005) LiDAR remote sensing: Overview of technology and applications. In Proceedings of the 26th Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing. Pages 491-. (Scopus )

Résumé

Airborne scanning laser altimetry, often referred as "lidar", is a technique used to produce dense and accurate point measurements of the elevation of the earth's surface using a combination of laser ranging, GPS, and inertial navigation systems. Lidar systems currently allow the acquisition of up to 100 000 XYZ data points per second. Because the highly collimated laser pulses have the capacity to penetrate vegetation canopies, lidar systems can reliably map terrestrial elevations under dense forests. Recent studies report Z errors below 30 cm under forest canopies, and of 10 cm or less on well defined smooth and exposed surfaces. The data products typically consist of at least two distinct XYZ point clouds corresponding to the first and last returns. The former reflects the elevation of surfaces visible from the aircraft vantage point: EXPOSED ground, vegetation, buildings or man made structures. This layer can be readily used without further processing as a digital surface model (DSM). The last returns must however be filtered so that only the ground level returns be kept. These "ground returns" can then be used as a digital terrain model (DTM), i.e. a representation of bare earth topography. Once this DTM is produced, a map of vegetation canopy height or building height can be created by simply calculating the elevation difference between the DSM and the DTM. The lidar DTMs are used to better predict flooding areas, establish the mass balance of glaciers, or reveal geological structures hidden under vegetation canopies. Lidar heights (DSM -DTM) are used to map vegetation height or biomass, or to reconstruct the geometry of buildings. Lidar 3D data is more and more being combined to aerial multispectral imagery to characterise both the type and the size of terrestrial objects. Thanks to the technological improvements that continue to bring down the costs of lidar surveys, some American or German states, as well as small countries such as the Netherlands and Switzerland, are now entirely covered by lidar data. Airborne scanning laser altimetry will likely become a key source of geospatial data in the near future.

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@INPROCEEDINGS { St-Onge2005,
    AUTHOR = { St-Onge, B. },
    TITLE = { LiDAR remote sensing: Overview of technology and applications },
    BOOKTITLE = { Proceedings of the 26th Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing },
    YEAR = { 2005 },
    PAGES = { 491-- },
    ABSTRACT = { Airborne scanning laser altimetry, often referred as "lidar", is a technique used to produce dense and accurate point measurements of the elevation of the earth's surface using a combination of laser ranging, GPS, and inertial navigation systems. Lidar systems currently allow the acquisition of up to 100 000 XYZ data points per second. Because the highly collimated laser pulses have the capacity to penetrate vegetation canopies, lidar systems can reliably map terrestrial elevations under dense forests. Recent studies report Z errors below 30 cm under forest canopies, and of 10 cm or less on well defined smooth and exposed surfaces. The data products typically consist of at least two distinct XYZ point clouds corresponding to the first and last returns. The former reflects the elevation of surfaces visible from the aircraft vantage point: EXPOSED ground, vegetation, buildings or man made structures. This layer can be readily used without further processing as a digital surface model (DSM). The last returns must however be filtered so that only the ground level returns be kept. These "ground returns" can then be used as a digital terrain model (DTM), i.e. a representation of bare earth topography. Once this DTM is produced, a map of vegetation canopy height or building height can be created by simply calculating the elevation difference between the DSM and the DTM. The lidar DTMs are used to better predict flooding areas, establish the mass balance of glaciers, or reveal geological structures hidden under vegetation canopies. Lidar heights (DSM -DTM) are used to map vegetation height or biomass, or to reconstruct the geometry of buildings. Lidar 3D data is more and more being combined to aerial multispectral imagery to characterise both the type and the size of terrestrial objects. Thanks to the technological improvements that continue to bring down the costs of lidar surveys, some American or German states, as well as small countries such as the Netherlands and Switzerland, are now entirely covered by lidar data. Airborne scanning laser altimetry will likely become a key source of geospatial data in the near future. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 1 June 2009 Source: Scopus },
    KEYWORDS = { Biomass, Data acquisition, Global positioning system, Inertial navigation systems, Laser pulses, Mapping, Vegetation, Airborne scanning laser altimetry, Digital surface model (DSM), Digital terrain model (DTM), Laser ranging, Lidar systems, Remote sensing },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2009.06.01 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745206698&partnerID=40 },
}

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