ChionBonnellLagroisEtAl2021

Référence

Chion, C., Bonnell, T.R., Lagrois, D., Michaud, R., Lesage, V., Dupuch, A., McQuinn, I.H., Turgeon, S. (2021) Agent-based modelling reveals a disproportionate exposure of females and calves to a local increase in shipping and associated noise in an endangered beluga population. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 173. (Scopus )

Résumé

Vessel underwater noise (VUN) is one of the main threats to the recovery of the endangered St. Lawrence Estuary Beluga population (SLEB). The 1% yearly population decline indicates that the cumulative threats are already beyond sustainable limits for the SLEB. However, a potential threefold increase in shipping traffic is expected within its critical habitat in the coming years resulting from proposed port-industrial projects in the Saguenay River. Current data indicate that SLEB typically use multiple sectors within their summer range, likely leading to differential VUN exposure among individuals. The degree of displacement and spatial mixing among habitats are not yet well understood but can be simulated under different assumptions about movement patterns at the individual and population levels. Here, we propose using an agent-based model (ABM) to explore the biases introduced when estimating exposure to stressors such as VUN, where individual-centric movement patterns and habitat use are derived from different spatial behaviour assumptions. Simulations of the ABM revealed that alternative behavioural assumptions for individual belugas can significantly alter the estimation of instantaneous and cumulative exposure of SLEB to VUN. Our simulations also predicted that with the projected traffic increase in the Saguenay River, the characteristics making it a quiet zone for SLEB within its critical habitat would be nullified. Whereas spending more time in the Saguenay than in the Estuary allows belugas to be exposed to less noise under the current traffic regime, this relationship is reversed under the increased traffic scenario. Considering the importance of the Saguenay for SLEB females and calves, our results support the need to understand its role as a possible acoustic refuge for this endangered population. This underlines the need to understand and describe individual and collective beluga behaviours using the best available data to conduct a thorough acoustic impact assessment concerning future increased traffic. © 2021 Elsevier Ltd

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@ARTICLE { ChionBonnellLagroisEtAl2021,
    AUTHOR = { Chion, C. and Bonnell, T.R. and Lagrois, D. and Michaud, R. and Lesage, V. and Dupuch, A. and McQuinn, I.H. and Turgeon, S. },
    JOURNAL = { Marine Pollution Bulletin },
    TITLE = { Agent-based modelling reveals a disproportionate exposure of females and calves to a local increase in shipping and associated noise in an endangered beluga population },
    YEAR = { 2021 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    VOLUME = { 173 },
    ABSTRACT = { Vessel underwater noise (VUN) is one of the main threats to the recovery of the endangered St. Lawrence Estuary Beluga population (SLEB). The 1% yearly population decline indicates that the cumulative threats are already beyond sustainable limits for the SLEB. However, a potential threefold increase in shipping traffic is expected within its critical habitat in the coming years resulting from proposed port-industrial projects in the Saguenay River. Current data indicate that SLEB typically use multiple sectors within their summer range, likely leading to differential VUN exposure among individuals. The degree of displacement and spatial mixing among habitats are not yet well understood but can be simulated under different assumptions about movement patterns at the individual and population levels. Here, we propose using an agent-based model (ABM) to explore the biases introduced when estimating exposure to stressors such as VUN, where individual-centric movement patterns and habitat use are derived from different spatial behaviour assumptions. Simulations of the ABM revealed that alternative behavioural assumptions for individual belugas can significantly alter the estimation of instantaneous and cumulative exposure of SLEB to VUN. Our simulations also predicted that with the projected traffic increase in the Saguenay River, the characteristics making it a quiet zone for SLEB within its critical habitat would be nullified. Whereas spending more time in the Saguenay than in the Estuary allows belugas to be exposed to less noise under the current traffic regime, this relationship is reversed under the increased traffic scenario. Considering the importance of the Saguenay for SLEB females and calves, our results support the need to understand its role as a possible acoustic refuge for this endangered population. This underlines the need to understand and describe individual and collective beluga behaviours using the best available data to conduct a thorough acoustic impact assessment concerning future increased traffic. © 2021 Elsevier Ltd },
    AFFILIATION = { Université du Québec en Outaouais, Département des Sciences naturelles, Gatineau, QC J8X 3X7, Canada; University of Lethbridge, Department of Psychology, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4, Canada; Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals (GREMM), Tadoussac, QC G0T 2A0, Canada; Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Maurice-Lamontagne Institute, Mont-Joli, QC G5H 3Z4, Canada; Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Maurice Lamontagne Institute, Mont-Joli, QC G5H 3Z4, Canada; Parks Canada, Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park, Tadoussac, QC G0T 2A0, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { 112977 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Acoustic impact assessment; Agent-based model; Behaviour; Shipping noise; Species at risk; St. Lawrence Estuary Beluga Population },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2021.112977 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85115779866&doi=10.1016%2fj.marpolbul.2021.112977&partnerID=40&md5=fac991c33c1d610ea8b11cfd051ec7db },
}

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