PanBouchardLegendreEtAl1998

Référence

Pan, D., Bouchard, A., Legendre, P., Domon, G. (1998) Influence of edaphic factors on the spatial structure of inland halophytic communities: A case study in China. Journal of Vegetation Science, 9(6):797-804.

Résumé

In order to understand the influence of edaphic factors on the spatial structure of inland halophytic plant communities, a 2.6 km2 study site, located on the lower fringe of the alluvial fan of the Hutubi River, in an arid region of China, was sampled and mapped. 105 patches were found to be homogeneous in species composition. Plant species and their coverage were recorded in each patch. 45 patches were randomly selected for the measurement of edaphic variables. A map with quadrat locations and boundaries of patches was digitized into a GIS and related to the vegetation and edaphic data matrices. CCA was used to evaluate the relative importance of edaphic factors in explaining the variation of the species assemblages and to identify the ecological preferences of species. The spatial structure of the communities and the main edaphic factors were analyzed using correlograms, Mantel correlograms and clustering under constraint of spatial contiguity. Gradient analysis showed that there are two distinct vegetation gradients in the study area, one of which is determined mainly by soil moisture (determined by depth to the water table), and the other by soil salinity (determined by electrical conductivity and hydrolytic alkalinity of the first soil layer). However, spatial analyses showed that at the sampling scale the halophytic communities in the study area are structured along one main spatial gradient determined by the water table level. Similar spatial autocorrelation structures between the factors related to the first soil layer and the communities, given our sampling scale, could not be detected. Our results suggest that the relative importance of the effects of different edaphic factors on the spatial structure of halophytic communities is scale-dependent. The partitioning of species variation indicates that in addition to edaphic factors, other factors, such as biotic interactions, may play an important role in structuring these communities.

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@ARTICLE { PanBouchardLegendreEtAl1998,
    AUTHOR = { Pan, D. and Bouchard, A. and Legendre, P. and Domon, G. },
    TITLE = { Influence of edaphic factors on the spatial structure of inland halophytic communities: A case study in China },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Vegetation Science },
    YEAR = { 1998 },
    VOLUME = { 9 },
    PAGES = { 797-804 },
    NUMBER = { 6 },
    NOTE = { 11009233 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 15 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: JVESE Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Bouchard, A.; Institut Recherche Biologie Vegetale; Universite de Montreal; 4101 rue Sherbrooke Est Montreal, Que. H1X 2B2, Canada; email: andre.bernard.bouchard@montreal.ca References: (1978) The Vegetation of Xinjiang and Its Utilization, , Edited by the Integrated investigation team of Xinjiang, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Science Press, Beijing. (In Chinese.); Allen, T.F.H., Hoekstra, T.W., Role of heterogeneity in scaling of ecological systems under analysis (1991) Ecological Heterogeneity, pp. 47-68. , Kolasa, J. \& Pickett, S.T.A. (eds.). Springer-Verlag, New York, NY; Badger, K.S., Ungar, I.A., Seedling competition and the distribution of Hordeum jubatum L. along a soil salinity gradient (1990) Funct. Ecol., 4, pp. 639-644; Barbour, M.G., Is any angiosperm an obligate halophyte? (1970) Am. Midl. Nat., 84, pp. 105-120; Barbour, M.G., The effect of competition and salinity on the growth of a salt marsh plant species (1978) Oecologia (Berl.), 37, pp. 93-99; Borcard, D., Legendre, P., Environmental control and spatial structure in ecological communities: An example using oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatei) (1994) Environ. Ecol. Stat., 1, pp. 37-61; Borcard, D., Legendre, P., Drapeau, P., Partialling out the spatial component of ecological variation (1992) Ecology, 73, pp. 1045-1055; Burchill, C.A., Kenkel, N.C., Vegetation-environment relationships of an inland boreal salt pan (1991) Can. J. Bot., 69, pp. 722-732; Carnevale, N.I., Torres, P.S., The relevance of physical factors on species distributions in inland salt marshes (Argentina) (1990) Coenoses, 5, pp. 113-120; Chapman, V.J., (1974) Salt Marshes and Salt Deserts of the World, , J. Cramer, Lehre; Dunson, W.A., Travis, J., The role of abiotic factors in community organization (1991) Am. 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(eds) NATO ASI Series, Springer-Verlag, Berlin; Legendre, P., Fortin, M.J., Spatial pattern and ecological analysis (1989) Vegetatio, 80, pp. 107-138; Legendre, P., Vaudor, A., (1991) The R Package: Multidimensional Analysis, Spatial Analysis, , De?partement de Sciences Biologiques, Universite? de Montre?al, Montre?al; Levin, S.A., The problem of pattern and scale in ecology (1992) Ecology, 73, pp. 1943-1967; Oksanen, J., Minchin, P.R., Instability of ordination results under changes in input data order: Explanations and remedies (1997) J. Veg. Sci., 8, pp. 447-454; Osmond, C.P., Austin, M.P., Berry, J.A., Billings, W.D., Boyer, J.S., Dacey, J.W.H., Nobel, P.S., Winner, W.E., Stress physiology and the distribution of plants (1987) Bioscience, 37, pp. 38-48; Palmer, M.W., Putting things in even better order: The advantages of canonical correspondence analysis (1993) Ecology, 74, pp. 2215-2230; Quinn, J.F., Dunham, A.E., On hypothesis testing in ecology and evolution (1983) Am. 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    ABSTRACT = { In order to understand the influence of edaphic factors on the spatial structure of inland halophytic plant communities, a 2.6 km2 study site, located on the lower fringe of the alluvial fan of the Hutubi River, in an arid region of China, was sampled and mapped. 105 patches were found to be homogeneous in species composition. Plant species and their coverage were recorded in each patch. 45 patches were randomly selected for the measurement of edaphic variables. A map with quadrat locations and boundaries of patches was digitized into a GIS and related to the vegetation and edaphic data matrices. CCA was used to evaluate the relative importance of edaphic factors in explaining the variation of the species assemblages and to identify the ecological preferences of species. The spatial structure of the communities and the main edaphic factors were analyzed using correlograms, Mantel correlograms and clustering under constraint of spatial contiguity. Gradient analysis showed that there are two distinct vegetation gradients in the study area, one of which is determined mainly by soil moisture (determined by depth to the water table), and the other by soil salinity (determined by electrical conductivity and hydrolytic alkalinity of the first soil layer). However, spatial analyses showed that at the sampling scale the halophytic communities in the study area are structured along one main spatial gradient determined by the water table level. Similar spatial autocorrelation structures between the factors related to the first soil layer and the communities, given our sampling scale, could not be detected. Our results suggest that the relative importance of the effects of different edaphic factors on the spatial structure of halophytic communities is scale-dependent. The partitioning of species variation indicates that in addition to edaphic factors, other factors, such as biotic interactions, may play an important role in structuring these communities. },
    KEYWORDS = { CCA GIS Indicator species Mantel test Soil salinity, Spatial autocorrelation Variation partitioning Xinjiang alluvial fan halophyte plant community soil property spatial analysis China },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.04 },
}

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