PaquetteBouchardCogliastro2007

Référence

Paquette, A., Bouchard, A., Cogliastro, A. (2007) Morphological plasticity in seedlings of three deciduous species under shelterwood under-planting management does not correspond to shade tolerance ranks. Forest Ecology and Management, 241(1-3):278-287.

Résumé

The morphological plasticity of tree seedlings is considered to be an important factor in shade tolerance and plant succession dynamics. However, recent studies comparing temperate deciduous species have not found the expected relationship between plasticity and shade tolerance or successional status. We measured morphological plasticity in seedlings of three temperate deciduous species of north-eastern North America, using 13 parameters associated with growth, crown geometry, branching, and leaf arrangement, as a function of a steep light gradient (0.5–43%) in young transition forests under shelterwood management. The effects of light and seedling height were investigated using variance partitioning. We studied naturally occurring seedlings of the very shade tolerant sugar maple (Acer saccharum), and planted seedlings of shade intolerant black cherry (Prunus serotina) and red oak (Quercus rubra), a species of intermediate shade tolerance. Contrary to expectations, sugar maple had the lowest light-induced plasticity and did not modify its morphology except as a function of height. It also produced relatively good growth. Moreover, black cherry displayed several unexpected characteristics, such as weak growth in response to increasing light and strong plasticity at several levels, mostly light-induced. Although red oak had a low level of overall plasticity, it produced the largest height increments under these shelterwoods. The morphological plasticity we observed lends support to models of shade tolerance which include resistance to pathogens and herbivory, and the capacity to store reserves, but still need to be supported with larger, integrated studies. Our results lead us to question how useful classic shade tolerance models based on morphological plasticity are for regeneration management and silviculture. At least under the pioneer stands we studied, both black cherry and sugar maple behaved in ways opposite to what was predicted.

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@ARTICLE { PaquetteBouchardCogliastro2007,
    AUTHOR = { Paquette, A. and Bouchard, A. and Cogliastro, A. },
    TITLE = { Morphological plasticity in seedlings of three deciduous species under shelterwood under-planting management does not correspond to shade tolerance ranks },
    JOURNAL = { Forest Ecology and Management },
    YEAR = { 2007 },
    VOLUME = { 241 },
    PAGES = { 278-287 },
    NUMBER = { 1-3 },
    NOTE = { pdf },
    ABSTRACT = { The morphological plasticity of tree seedlings is considered to be an important factor in shade tolerance and plant succession dynamics. However, recent studies comparing temperate deciduous species have not found the expected relationship between plasticity and shade tolerance or successional status. We measured morphological plasticity in seedlings of three temperate deciduous species of north-eastern North America, using 13 parameters associated with growth, crown geometry, branching, and leaf arrangement, as a function of a steep light gradient (0.5–43%) in young transition forests under shelterwood management. The effects of light and seedling height were investigated using variance partitioning. We studied naturally occurring seedlings of the very shade tolerant sugar maple (Acer saccharum), and planted seedlings of shade intolerant black cherry (Prunus serotina) and red oak (Quercus rubra), a species of intermediate shade tolerance. Contrary to expectations, sugar maple had the lowest light-induced plasticity and did not modify its morphology except as a function of height. It also produced relatively good growth. Moreover, black cherry displayed several unexpected characteristics, such as weak growth in response to increasing light and strong plasticity at several levels, mostly light-induced. Although red oak had a low level of overall plasticity, it produced the largest height increments under these shelterwoods. The morphological plasticity we observed lends support to models of shade tolerance which include resistance to pathogens and herbivory, and the capacity to store reserves, but still need to be supported with larger, integrated studies. Our results lead us to question how useful classic shade tolerance models based on morphological plasticity are for regeneration management and silviculture. At least under the pioneer stands we studied, both black cherry and sugar maple behaved in ways opposite to what was predicted. },
    KEYWORDS = { Morphological plasticity; Successional status; Shade tolerance; Under-planting; Variance partitioning; Available light; Acer saccharum; Prunus serotina; Quercus rubra },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.04 },
}

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